An American Plague: The True and Terrifying Story of the Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1793

An American Plague: The True and Terrifying Story of the Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1793★ An American Plague: The True and Terrifying Story of the Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1793 PDF / Epub ✪ Author Jim Murphy – Oaklandjobs.co.uk , Philadelphia The nation s capital and the largest city in North America is devastated by an apparently incurable disease, cause unknownJim Murphy describes the illness known as yellow fever and the , Philadelphia The nation s capital and Plague: The MOBI ï the largest city in North America is devastated by an apparently incurable disease, cause unknownJim Murphy describes the illness known as yellow fever and the toll it took on the city s residents, relating the epidemic to the major social and political events of the day and An American PDF/EPUB or to th century medical beliefs and practices Drawing on first hand accounts, Murphy spotlights the heroic role of Philadelphia s free blacks in combating the disease, and the Constitutional crisis that President Washington faced when he was forced to leave the city and all his papers while escaping the deadly contagion The search for the American Plague: The Kindle Ï fever s causes and cure, not found for than a century afterward, provides a suspenseful counterpoint to this riveting true story of a city under siege. it is inconceivable to me that this is a book intended for children the beginning part is fine, but the last chapter or so is paralyzingly terrifying if i had read this as a child, it would have given me night terrors for years and even now i would think of it with chills, as i do with The Tailypo A Ghost Story brrr this book chronicles an outbreak of yellow fever that killed 5000 people and by chronicling, i mean it goes into details of black bile vomiting, and women giving birth to bab it is inconceivable to me that this is a book intended for children the beginning part is fine, but the last chapter or so is paralyzingly terrifying if i had read this as a child, it would have given me night terrors for years and even now i would think of it with chills, as i do with The Tailypo A Ghost Story brrr this book chronicles an outbreak of yellow fever that killed 5000 people and by chronicling, i mean it goes into details of black bile vomiting, and women giving birth to babies where both die within moments etc and then THEN the last chapter is devoted to the oh so reassuring information that there is still no cure and it is only a matter of time before this happens again and mosquitoes are getting stronger and stronger and we have fewer options for prevention and its delivered in this blithe, casual shrugging tone, AND THIS IS HOW THE BOOK ENDS not with a bang, but a quiet buzzing.and now we have this.come to my blog I have to admit that I learned some things from this book I had no idea that for about 3 months the Federal government got shut down because of yellow fever Imagine that For three months nothing happened in the government, no laws were passed, no meetings, nothing and yet the world still went on, and this at a time muchcritical than normal, when part of the population wanted another revolution to go along with the French Revolution, and the entire country was only a few years old So be I have to admit that I learned some things from this book I had no idea that for about 3 months the Federal government got shut down because of yellow fever Imagine that For three months nothing happened in the government, no laws were passed, no meetings, nothing and yet the world still went on, and this at a time muchcritical than normal, when part of the population wanted another revolution to go along with the French Revolution, and the entire country was only a few years old So because all of the people in government were afraid of catching the disease they went home for awhile, left their papers behind, and didn t meet up and do anything because at the time convening the Congress anywhere else would have been unconstitutional And I ll say it again, things went on and the world didn t end, and the country didn t collapse in on itself, all kinds of things didn t happen Neat huh This isn t the moral of the story, that government is sort of worthless, and that people can kind of take care of themselves without being treated like ignorant four year olds sadly though most people are just about as good at behaving without authority as an ignorant four year old, sigh that s not the moral at all of this book Instead it s about disease, and exposing kids to what medicine was like in the 1790 s, and what life was like then, and how a group of African Americans showed themselves to be just about the only decent people in a city being ravaged by disease, fear and paranoia and how these same decent people later got the shaft from cowardly white folk who ran to the hills as soon as they saw plague like things coming at them I don t know much about kids, or really what age this book is meant for, but this is actually a pretty heavy book for kids, but kind of cool too because weaved into the story are all kinds of little sub texts that could work as rational time bombs on their developing minds I would give it four stars, but a few of the sentences really bothered me, and the authors use of exclamation points in the latter part of the book irked me with it s unnecessary junvinality is this even a word , something the book I feel had avoided up until those pesky little punctuation marks reared their heads A fascinating review of an event not so long ago that could be repeated in our heavily populated cities and poorly prepared hospitals An interesting aspect is the courageous role that African Americans played which was largely ignored by history Also, the aspect of scentists battling an unknown disease with some unfortunate consequences The man who should be credited with figuring it out watched the mosquito bite him that ended up killing him. That final sentence hits differently in 2020 This was a significant event in the history of the U.S., yet I don t remember hearing it mentioned in school Not only did it directly impact thousands of people, it also closed down the Federal gov t, resulting in a revision of some laws It also sparked heated medical debate among the physicians who knew very little about the disease Chapter 5 focuses on the Free African Society which had been founded in 1787, as the first organization in American created by blacks for blacks. Amazingly, a This was a significant event in the history of the U.S., yet I don t remember hearing it mentioned in school Not only did it directly impact thousands of people, it also closed down the Federal gov t, resulting in a revision of some laws It also sparked heated medical debate among the physicians who knew very little about the disease Chapter 5 focuses on the Free African Society which had been founded in 1787, as the first organization in American created by blacks for blacks. Amazingly, after the treatment they d received from the white community, the society agreed to serve as nurses to the vast number of whites who lay sick and abandoned in their homes Not only were the nurses endangering their own health, the work was decidedly unpleasant and often thankless.The novel Fever 1793 by Laurie Halse Anderson complements the facts presented in this book When I purchased this book, it was through Scholastic a few years ago back when I had a bunch of points to use on my class Fast forward three years ahead to last week, when I had to do some tidying up in my classroom, I found this in a stack of books I haven t read yet Of course it became next on my list to read because of how much it seemed to mirror our current situation When I opened the book, I recognized the first name I saw Dr Benjamin Rush This name triggered a memory I had of a bi When I purchased this book, it was through Scholastic a few years ago back when I had a bunch of points to use on my class Fast forward three years ahead to last week, when I had to do some tidying up in my classroom, I found this in a stack of books I haven t read yet Of course it became next on my list to read because of how much it seemed to mirror our current situation When I opened the book, I recognized the first name I saw Dr Benjamin Rush This name triggered a memory I had of a biography project I did when I was in 3rd or 4th grade I chose to research Benjamin Rush because he was one of my great something grandfathers My mom showed me an old family tree written on a massive piece of paper with names traced all the way back to before the Revolution I learned that Benjamin Rush s signature is on The Declaration of Independence, he was a confidant of President George Washington, and was a famously known doctor in Philadelphia during the American Revolution Of course I perked up when I saw his name in this book and was reminded of this special piece of family history From reading this book of which is a main character I learned that he was SO MUCH MORE than all that my elementary school self was able to find on Ask Jeeves This narrative begins when Dr Rush was called to the bedside of a gravely ill young lady by two of his colleagues When he saw her symptoms, he suspected very quickly that Philadelphia would need to be warned of this mysterious fever He sent word to many living in his neighborhood, and caused significant panic throughout the town Many fled while he stayed to care for the increasing numbers of ill residents Apparently, he is credited with the discovery of the 1793 Yellow Fever Epidemic, as well as a controversial cure for the disease controversial because he basically poisoned his patients to initiate a purge of anything toxic in their bodies He found the cure to be highly successful He even came down with Yellow Fever TWICE himself and used his own cure, making his own body his evidence.I could go on and on, but the point is This was a PERFECTLY timed read I am so proud that I have this story to tell I am rating it 5 stars because 1 it is highly intriguing, well researched, and ends with a creepy foreshadowing into the world s current situation, and 2 this personal connection left me speechless, and with a passion to pursue readingnon fiction from this portion of medical history There are themes to this one that seem a wee bit strong for a work written for youth but it should certainly garner discussion I learned a fair number of new historical facts in this one and truly appreciated the research and concise presentation of the events surrounding the 1793 yellow fever epidemic as well as so many other epidemics of this disease which hit different cities in the States This is not a happy book, but you will learn a thing or two I especially appreciated the fair and bal There are themes to this one that seem a wee bit strong for a work written for youth but it should certainly garner discussion I learned a fair number of new historical facts in this one and truly appreciated the research and concise presentation of the events surrounding the 1793 yellow fever epidemic as well as so many other epidemics of this disease which hit different cities in the States This is not a happy book, but you will learn a thing or two I especially appreciated the fair and balanced look at one of my favorite Founding Fathers, Benjamin Rush A couple of quotes about him He was passionate and outspoken in his beliefs, no matter what the subject He opposed slavery, felt that alcohol and tobacco should be avoided, urged that the corporal punishment of children be stopped, and thought that the best way to keep a democracy strong was by having universal education To his credit, Rush did not hesitate to use his own cure when the yellow fever struck him down He turned himself over to two of his young assistants, who bled him and administered the purge It would be months before Rush truly regained his strength, but within five days he was back on his feet and valiantly seeing patients in his home Good book about the plague, with an accessible level and a small length that avoids to become bored.The book explained well the spread of the disease and gave a good insight on the cures that were tried, the number of deaths and the life conditions at this time As a foreigner, I knew nothing about the illness and the events, so it was interesting to discover it For an apocalyptic books lover, it was also a fun read, mostly because it depicted with no surprises how people reacted to it the one Good book about the plague, with an accessible level and a small length that avoids to become bored.The book explained well the spread of the disease and gave a good insight on the cures that were tried, the number of deaths and the life conditions at this time As a foreigner, I knew nothing about the illness and the events, so it was interesting to discover it For an apocalyptic books lover, it was also a fun read, mostly because it depicted with no surprises how people reacted to it the ones that flew away, the ones that died, the ones that continued to help save the day even if the risk of being ill dead was huge, and the ones that find new ways to makemoney Even if the cures weren t something I d like to try nowadays, I found compelling to follow the doctors and then later the scientists working on the disease It was also nice to see how the black community was involved in provinding nursing and how the population was totally thankful no, I m joking, they weren t all thankful, as expected Good job for the last chapter, well documented at a scientific level, it matched what I know about the vectors I didn t care about the illustrations, but they gave a nice old school touch to the read and completed the context This was packed with so much information I never heard of before I ve read one book about the plague in another city Both books are similar in information however this one gives a lotinteresting info Highly recommend this. Ok, so I m on a roll here reading about disease and epidemics This one sparked my curiosity because in The Great Influenza , Philadelphia is hit badly by the 1918 influenza epidemic It looks like in this book Philadelphia was also badly hit in 1793 by the yellow fever epidemic Gotta read it to find outThis book is a Newberry Honor book for children As such it is not difficult reading at all, but still was worthwhile to read.In the summer of 1793 yellow fever hit Philadelphia and Ok, so I m on a roll here reading about disease and epidemics This one sparked my curiosity because in The Great Influenza , Philadelphia is hit badly by the 1918 influenza epidemic It looks like in this book Philadelphia was also badly hit in 1793 by the yellow fever epidemic Gotta read it to find outThis book is a Newberry Honor book for children As such it is not difficult reading at all, but still was worthwhile to read.In the summer of 1793 yellow fever hit Philadelphia and killed 10% of the population of the city in the first month of the epidemic, eventually killing 4 to 5,000 people At the time, the cause of yellow fever was unknown, and treatments went from mild to extreme Philadelphia in the 1790 s had cramped and dirty streets, trash and rubbish and sewage standing in stagnant ponds in the streets contributing to the breeding of mosquitos, the carrier for yellow fever.The mosquitos that carried yellow fever to Philadelphia most likely came from Haiti where many French refugees fled from the revolution going on there, and arrived in Philadelphia Some of these people may have been ill with yellow fever when they arrived, and also the ships may have brought mosquitos that were carriers into the city.Controversy raged between doctors over appropriate treatment Dr Benjamin Rush, one of the founding fathers of the Unites States was also a physician He was known as the king of the bleeders because that was his preferred way to treat yellow fever patients during the epidemic One other physician at the time accused Dr Rush of killingyellow fever patients with his cure than would have died from the disease itself It is hard to criticize either doctor, because of course neither one of them knew for sure what really caused yellow fever.The epidemic waned as cooler weather came, as the marshes and swamps dried up and thus the mosquitos had fewer breeding places There were subsequent yellow fever outbreaks in following years, but never the extent of what they had been in 1793 The 1793 epidemic did result in a clean up of the streets of the city, removing dead animals and rubbish, emptying barrels of stagnant water and anything that contributed to the stench around the harbor area In doing this, the mosquito breeding grounds were reduced, and that brought better health to the city even though they did not know that mosquitos were carriers of the disease.Eveninteresting to me was the fact that George Washington, President of the United States at the time, was kept from making important decisions largely because Congress could not be convened anywhere other than Philadelphia and yet all governmental officials had fled the city because of the epidemic The founding fathers had had a healthy fear of a king whimsically calling the government into session in some remotely located area, thus keeping the government from holding him accountable so they had pretty much said that Congress could only meet in Philadelphia The epidemic meant that for 6 to 8 weeks, no one could conduct any governmental business So after the epidemic, Congress did allow a provision that the president could call congress into session at another location in emergency situations.It is interesting to note that the issue of whether the United States would support their former ally, France, in their revolution needed to be decided in exactly this time Because Washington was unable to convene Congress, this approval was delayed And by the time the epidemic was over, support for the French issue had waned

An American Plague: The True and Terrifying Story of the
  • Hardcover
  • 165 pages
  • An American Plague: The True and Terrifying Story of the Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1793
  • Jim Murphy
  • English
  • 27 March 2019
  • 0395776082