Orope The White Snake

Orope The White Snake➚ [KINDLE] ❄ Orope The White Snake By Guenevere Lee ➤ – Oaklandjobs.co.uk The Bronze Age saw the beginning of empires, as well as their mysterious and catastrophic end In a world not unlike our own, the nomadic Whisperers of the Gods have been given a grave vision of the go The Bronze Age saw the beginning of empires, as well as their mysterious and catastrophic end In a world not unlike our own, the nomadic Whisperers of the Gods have been given a grave vision Orope The eBook × of the gods destroying the world in a great flood, and they send three messengers to the great empires in hopes of appeasing the gods Finding themselves in strange new lands with even stranger customs, the Whisperers soon discover the hardest thing is not only convincing the kings and queens to listen, but reaching their destinations without falling prey to the dangers and resisting the temptations of these new lands In this first novel, readers experience a lost age where the gods live in the wind and waves, and beasts lurk in the dark. Rashma Hal'Hoten, Rekra Hal'Hashap. Akrape Hal'Whata, and Karesha Hal'Harag, shall climb the mountain to Matawe and go into Kerla Hal'gepe to find the Goddess of Death, and then return to the Sea of Hatmahe


..My God! I couldn't pronounce any of the words in this book. Since it's all just made up anyway. Why couldn't we just say, Jack and Jill went up the hill and came down the other side to the sea? At least I would understand this. I had to spend so much time just trying to pronounce the words , that I couldn't really follow the story line. Maybe it's just me. I only read this book because they were giving it away for free the other day. I guess it's true. You get what you pay for

TJ We met the author at a bookstore in Kingston, ON a few months ago and she told us it would be coming out as an audiobook soon. We just drove across the country from NY to NV, and this story got us from Lake Ontario to the Mississippi. The story is unique and engaging- I already feel attached to the characters. I am an archaeologist, and I appreciate how well researched the history is. The story takes you to several different parts of this fictional bronze age world, from the nomadic desert tribes to the jungle (based on the ancient Maya/Aztec) to the big river civilization (based on ancient Egypt). The world building and character development are incredible, and the imagery is very descriptive. I love the cultural interactions between the characters from different lands. Wow! Can't wait for the next one! Can't wait to read this! Looking forward to delving into the complex world and meeting the characters created by this imaginative author. Sure, I had to Wikipedia the Bronze Age before I started reading but once I got into the book I didn't have any trouble. Interesting characters and a unique story, looking forward to the sequel! Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this book from the GoodReads First Reads program.

Orope drops you right in the middle of an annual Bronze Age ritual that is meant to predict and create a calendar of events for the upcoming year. This ritual is a great example of the world building in this book. It feels real, like you’re reading about an actual rite from a real ancient civilization. It’s clear that the author is both very familiar with Bronze Age peoples and that she put a great deal of thought into creating the cultures depicted in the book (and the history, rituals, and customs that come with those cultures).

In fact, the best part of this book is the world itself. Firstly, the Bronze Age is not an overly popular time period to work with in fiction, so that by itself makes the book unique. Secondly, the different societies in the novel are clearly based on real ancient civilizations (Egypt, Aztec/Inca, desert nomads), so much of the story feels like historical fiction. But then something will happen that swings the pendulum back towards the mystical, giving the whole thing a weird sort of fictional-magical realism vibe (or maybe the ancient past of an alternate reality), which I really enjoyed. The familiar would lull you into a false sense of security, only to abruptly remind you that this universe is fiction and there no guarantee that the heroes will save it.

My main complaint about this book is that the story itself doesn’t really stand alone. Maybe I missed it, but I don’t remember seeing anywhere that this would be the first book in a new series. I went in expecting a self-contained book, and so I was disappointed when it ended without tying up a lot of the storylines that had been introduced. However, this would probably be much less jarring if the reader goes into the book knowing that it is only Book 1.

Overall, I enjoyed the book and would recommend it to anyone interested in the Bronze Age or in a fantasy world based on something other than medieval Europe.
https://audrasbookblabbing.wordpress
.


Cleanliness: Trash (10+ curse words, multiple descriptions of body parts, multiple descriptive and non-descriptive sex, ritual cutting, descriptive human sacrifices, animal sacrifices, nudity, blood, drinking, gods, sexualizing women, kissing, and death.)

I have never read a book like this book. Maybe that's just me not reading enough unique books, but this is honestly one of the most unusual books I've ever read. It throws you into a world of mythology and makes you believe it is real.

The first chapter seemed like an ancient how-to manual on rituals. It was interesting, but the rituals were way too descriptive for me (especially the ones about gyrating to the music to make blessed babies). I don't necessarily believe the rituals were historically inaccurate, but it was just too much.

The second chapter immediately got into the adventure. Oddly enough, the first thing I thought of to compare it to was a super intense version of Disney's Moana. The storyline divided in this section, and the chapters (mostly) alternated points of view. This was done well, but I found the character names hard to keep up with.

Since I read this before it was fully published, I am assuming they are going to fix this, but I thought I should mention that there were quite a few spelling/grammar errors. My favorite mistake was when they were talking about the furry of the gods. Haha!

Orope -- The White Snake is going to be continued in a second book Pekari -- The Azure Fish. This book was a little slow at times, completely disgustingly detailed, but very, very unique.

~I was sent a free copy of this book from Morgan James Fiction and AuthorsDen~ “Orope The White Snake,” the debut historical fiction novel of Guenevere Lee, transports us to the Bronze Age, fleshing out Egyptian-like lands, blood-thirsty customs and god-like kings and queens. Lee does an admirable job of creating this world, bringing to life three characters who are chosen to complete a seemingly impossible task of trying to appease the gods. Every chapter is illustrated with ancient-looking maps, showing their path. The characters take on this task and venture to unknown lands, and the reader is left at end begging to know where the tale will lead next. Fortunately, a companion book to “Orope,” - “Pekari – the Azure Fish” continues the story, and is in the works. A great piece of world building. The mashup of familiar concepts related to famous Bronze Age cultures with unique narrators does an incredible job of drawing you into the books. I eagerly await the sequel. As a fantasy/sci-fi fan and history lover, I found Orope refreshing since it’s placed in a fantastical bronze age in the already saturated market of medieval-fantasy novels.
The book’s world was heavily influenced by both Ancient Egypt and pre-Columbian American people. Even though the scant 300 pages wasn’t enough to developed a complex world to its fullest potential, the book was able to immerse me in the world, which will probably be expanded in the already announced sequel.
The book started a little bit slow but built up intensity after the first 100 pages. In some moments I wished there were more details in the description of the different countries, but I found a lot of useful information on the wiki listed at the end of the novel, and I found the world very interesting.

My final mark: 4/5. It’s a slow burn of novel, and in some moments it seemed to run out of space to develop the world, something that probably will be solved with the publish of the next books of the saga that seem to have great potential.
I love Ancient Egypt and fantasy, so this book really scratched an itch for me. I cannot wait to read the sequel.

Orope The White Snake PDF/EPUB ↠ Orope The  eBook
    This guide aims to show you how to download stranger customs, the Whisperers soon discover the hardest thing is not only convincing the kings and queens to listen, but reaching their destinations without falling prey to the dangers and resisting the temptations of these new lands In this first novel, readers experience a lost age where the gods live in the wind and waves, and beasts lurk in the dark. Rashma Hal'Hoten, Rekra Hal'Hashap. Akrape Hal'Whata, and Karesha Hal'Harag, shall climb the mountain to Matawe and go into Kerla Hal'gepe to find the Goddess of Death, and then return to the Sea of Hatmahe


    ..My God! I couldn't pronounce any of the words in this book. Since it's all just made up anyway. Why couldn't we just say, Jack and Jill went up the hill and came down the other side to the sea? At least I would understand this. I had to spend so much time just trying to pronounce the words , that I couldn't really follow the story line. Maybe it's just me. I only read this book because they were giving it away for free the other day. I guess it's true. You get what you pay for

    TJ We met the author at a bookstore in Kingston, ON a few months ago and she told us it would be coming out as an audiobook soon. We just drove across the country from NY to NV, and this story got us from Lake Ontario to the Mississippi. The story is unique and engaging- I already feel attached to the characters. I am an archaeologist, and I appreciate how well researched the history is. The story takes you to several different parts of this fictional bronze age world, from the nomadic desert tribes to the jungle (based on the ancient Maya/Aztec) to the big river civilization (based on ancient Egypt). The world building and character development are incredible, and the imagery is very descriptive. I love the cultural interactions between the characters from different lands. Wow! Can't wait for the next one! Can't wait to read this! Looking forward to delving into the complex world and meeting the characters created by this imaginative author. Sure, I had to Wikipedia the Bronze Age before I started reading but once I got into the book I didn't have any trouble. Interesting characters and a unique story, looking forward to the sequel! Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this book from the GoodReads First Reads program.

    Orope drops you right in the middle of an annual Bronze Age ritual that is meant to predict and create a calendar of events for the upcoming year. This ritual is a great example of the world building in this book. It feels real, like you’re reading about an actual rite from a real ancient civilization. It’s clear that the author is both very familiar with Bronze Age peoples and that she put a great deal of thought into creating the cultures depicted in the book (and the history, rituals, and customs that come with those cultures).

    In fact, the best part of this book is the world itself. Firstly, the Bronze Age is not an overly popular time period to work with in fiction, so that by itself makes the book unique. Secondly, the different societies in the novel are clearly based on real ancient civilizations (Egypt, Aztec/Inca, desert nomads), so much of the story feels like historical fiction. But then something will happen that swings the pendulum back towards the mystical, giving the whole thing a weird sort of fictional-magical realism vibe (or maybe the ancient past of an alternate reality), which I really enjoyed. The familiar would lull you into a false sense of security, only to abruptly remind you that this universe is fiction and there no guarantee that the heroes will save it.

    My main complaint about this book is that the story itself doesn’t really stand alone. Maybe I missed it, but I don’t remember seeing anywhere that this would be the first book in a new series. I went in expecting a self-contained book, and so I was disappointed when it ended without tying up a lot of the storylines that had been introduced. However, this would probably be much less jarring if the reader goes into the book knowing that it is only Book 1.

    Overall, I enjoyed the book and would recommend it to anyone interested in the Bronze Age or in a fantasy world based on something other than medieval Europe.
    https://audrasbookblabbing.wordpress
    .


    Cleanliness: Trash (10+ curse words, multiple descriptions of body parts, multiple descriptive and non-descriptive sex, ritual cutting, descriptive human sacrifices, animal sacrifices, nudity, blood, drinking, gods, sexualizing women, kissing, and death.)

    I have never read a book like this book. Maybe that's just me not reading enough unique books, but this is honestly one of the most unusual books I've ever read. It throws you into a world of mythology and makes you believe it is real.

    The first chapter seemed like an ancient how-to manual on rituals. It was interesting, but the rituals were way too descriptive for me (especially the ones about gyrating to the music to make blessed babies). I don't necessarily believe the rituals were historically inaccurate, but it was just too much.

    The second chapter immediately got into the adventure. Oddly enough, the first thing I thought of to compare it to was a super intense version of Disney's Moana. The storyline divided in this section, and the chapters (mostly) alternated points of view. This was done well, but I found the character names hard to keep up with.

    Since I read this before it was fully published, I am assuming they are going to fix this, but I thought I should mention that there were quite a few spelling/grammar errors. My favorite mistake was when they were talking about the furry of the gods. Haha!

    Orope -- The White Snake is going to be continued in a second book Pekari -- The Azure Fish. This book was a little slow at times, completely disgustingly detailed, but very, very unique.

    ~I was sent a free copy of this book from Morgan James Fiction and AuthorsDen~ “Orope The White Snake,” the debut historical fiction novel of Guenevere Lee, transports us to the Bronze Age, fleshing out Egyptian-like lands, blood-thirsty customs and god-like kings and queens. Lee does an admirable job of creating this world, bringing to life three characters who are chosen to complete a seemingly impossible task of trying to appease the gods. Every chapter is illustrated with ancient-looking maps, showing their path. The characters take on this task and venture to unknown lands, and the reader is left at end begging to know where the tale will lead next. Fortunately, a companion book to “Orope,” - “Pekari – the Azure Fish” continues the story, and is in the works. A great piece of world building. The mashup of familiar concepts related to famous Bronze Age cultures with unique narrators does an incredible job of drawing you into the books. I eagerly await the sequel. As a fantasy/sci-fi fan and history lover, I found Orope refreshing since it’s placed in a fantastical bronze age in the already saturated market of medieval-fantasy novels.
    The book’s world was heavily influenced by both Ancient Egypt and pre-Columbian American people. Even though the scant 300 pages wasn’t enough to developed a complex world to its fullest potential, the book was able to immerse me in the world, which will probably be expanded in the already announced sequel.
    The book started a little bit slow but built up intensity after the first 100 pages. In some moments I wished there were more details in the description of the different countries, but I found a lot of useful information on the wiki listed at the end of the novel, and I found the world very interesting.

    My final mark: 4/5. It’s a slow burn of novel, and in some moments it seemed to run out of space to develop the world, something that probably will be solved with the publish of the next books of the saga that seem to have great potential.
    I love Ancient Egypt and fantasy, so this book really scratched an itch for me. I cannot wait to read the sequel. "/>
  • Paperback
  • 286 pages
  • Orope The White Snake
  • Guenevere Lee
  • English
  • 13 January 2019
  • 9781683507390