Inferno: A Doctor's Ebola Story

Inferno: A Doctor's Ebola Story❮PDF❯ ✫ Inferno: A Doctor's Ebola Story ✓ Author Steven Hatch – Oaklandjobs.co.uk Dr Steven Hatch first came to Liberia in November , to work at a hospital in Monrovia Six months later, several of the physicians Dr Hatch had mentored and served with were dead or barely clinging to Dr Steven Hatch Doctor's Ebola PDF/EPUB ¿ first came to Liberia in November , to work at a hospital in Monrovia Six months later, several of the physicians Dr Hatch had mentored and served with were dead or barely clinging to life, and Ebola had become a world health emergency Hundreds of victims perished each week whole families were destroyed in a matter of days so many died so quickly that the culturally taboo practice of cremation had to be instituted to dispose of the bodies With little help from the international community and a population ravaged by disease and fear, the Inferno: A PDF/EPUB or war torn African nation was simply unprepared to deal with the catastropheA physician s memoir about the ravages of a terrible disease and the small hospital that fought to contain it, Inferno is also an explanation of the science and biology of Ebola how it is transmitted and spreads with such ferocity And as Dr Hatch notes, while Ebola is temporarily under control, it will inevitably re emerge as will other plagues, notably the Zika virus, which the World Health Organization has declared a public health emergency Inferno is a glimpse into the white hot center of a crisis A Doctor's Ebola PDF ↠ that will come again. I have a small connection with Liberia A customer was the US expert on Liberia and he found a book in my shop on Liberia that he had never seen before He didn t buy it, too heavy to take home but it turned him into a friend and I was on the cruise ship history tours, not four meals a day plus midnight buffet ones list of 100 best Indie bookshops The author says that the founding of Liberia for free American Blacks wasn t quite the utopian enterprise a lot of us believe it was For a start t I have a small connection with Liberia A customer was the US expert on Liberia and he found a book in my shop on Liberia that he had never seen before He didn t buy it, too heavy to take home but it turned him into a friend and I was on the cruise ship history tours, not four meals a day plus midnight buffet ones list of 100 best Indie bookshops The author says that the founding of Liberia for free American Blacks wasn t quite the utopian enterprise a lot of us believe it was For a start the only desirable part of Liberia had been annexed by the British Secondly, returning free Blacks to Liberia as if Liberia was all of Africa when their ancestors might have been sold from any part of the continent made no sense Thirdly, these free Blacks were living good lives in the Northern states They were tradesmen and craftsmen, they were middle class, they were educated, they were doing well But much as the North cared about slavery in general, they didn t care about it as it applied to individuals, not at all So the free Blacks lived in constant threat of being kidnapped and sold into Slavery in the South That was why they left And the local Liberians didn t welcome these Americans at all To a racist, sharing a Black skin, made them all the same, but of course their culture was completely different.What was so ironic was that the economy, in tatters when they arrived in Liberia, had been built entirely on capturing and selling slaves I don t know how muchof this book I can stand The author doesn t leave a single thing out, and describes not only what he does, such as including where he bought a usb power strip and what was wrong with it, but also how he felt about it, how he discussed it, his tone of voice and the level off difficulty He has the passion and the black white view of the world I did at 17 I admire him for maintaining it and where it matters, like a potted history of Liberia and slavery it was interesting Otherwise, it could have been cut down to 25% and might have been a good book And a short one I m over 50% in and think that s it.But outside of the over detail, it s actually a good book, so as not to put off those withfortitude than me, I will give it 3 stars Emile Ouamouno fell ill in late December 2013 Nobody knows what his precise symptoms were because hardly anyone who cared for him is left alive. 20 It seems strange that the Ebola crisis, which dominated the news for so long, is but a memory for most people in the Western world now I followed it pretty closely and was eager to see what books came out of this.Hatch is an American doctor, but he found his way to Liberia to do what he could as soon as he understood the severity of the crisis Un Emile Ouamouno fell ill in late December 2013 Nobody knows what his precise symptoms were because hardly anyone who cared for him is left alive. 20 It seems strange that the Ebola crisis, which dominated the news for so long, is but a memory for most people in the Western world now I followed it pretty closely and was eager to see what books came out of this.Hatch is an American doctor, but he found his way to Liberia to do what he could as soon as he understood the severity of the crisis Understand Ebola is not new, but the way it spread in Liberia and other parts of West Africa was new there wasn t really a road map for this.This isn t really Hatch s story He says early on that he chose to keep the book focused on the disease and on the people battling it, and that he does, only occasionally talking about things likewell, like leaving his family behind to go on what he thought was effectively a suicide mission and then the discombobulation of realising that he probably wasn t going to contract Ebola But he has some wonderful insights into what was going on, both on a small scale and on a broader scale Take this In terms of diagnostics, the ETU Ebola Treatment Unit practiced twenty first century medicine for Ebola and nineteenth century medicine for everything else At the time I arrived in Liberia, there was no functioning health care system besides ETUs Essentially all the hospitals and clinics were closed So these people who were brought in but tested negative for Ebola in some sense represented all the otherconditions that were being ignored in the midst of the Ebola crisis It wasn t merely killing the people it infected it was killing people who were dying of everything else that could be treated, since there was nowhere to turn. 83 Elsewhere, he talks about the relationship people in the area have with the hospital In the coming days I made inquiries about the mortality rate at JFK the hospital , and my mind reeled Oh, it s about 40 percent, Ian told me, almost with the casual air of someone who had been following the price of Apple s stock The problem is that people know that if you go to JFK, you ve got a pretty good chance of dying, so they delay coming when we might be able to makeof a difference, and then they end up coming so far along in their illness that they don t do well, and you have this high mortality rate, which reinforces the sense that you come here to die The mortality on the surgical service in 2013, according to the residents with whom I spoke, was an astonishing 70 percent , for much the same reasons. 41 42 I m reminded of Edward Hume, who talks about opening a hospital in China in the early 1900s and understanding that, to gain the trust of the people his hospital aimed to serve, the hospital would have to go two years without any patient deaths in hospital, which meant treating only minor maladies for a long time I don t suppose that s an option that JFK had or has, but the cyclical nature of it all is so terribly sad.I m curious about this, too I thought a lot about fluids in particular, intravenous fluids If, as my own two eyes had shown me, Ebola was a disease closer in appearance to severe gastroenteritis than it was to a river of blood being unleashed, then giving back as much fluid as possible might take a disease with a 50 to 70 percent mortality and turn it into one with a 10 to 20 percent mortality. 241 I wondered something along those lines, back when the Ebola crisis was hitting a fever pitch The Westerners who contracted Ebola and were evacuated or contracted it back home it s impossible for me as a layperson, not a medical professional, not a researcher, etc to know how much difference the Ebola specific treatments made and how much difference basic things like hydration made, but I m reminded of cholera, with which patients have a vastly better chance of survival if they re properly hydrated I m really the wrong person to hypothesise about this see above re not being a doctor or researcher or whatever , but I hope the research that comes out of this outbreak can answer a lot of questions.But back to the book Nicely thorough and thoughtful I learned a lot, and outside a couple of history dense sections, it was a really engaging read Recommended to anyone interested in the topic 2.5 starsWhile I give Dr Hatch full credit for his dedication to helping those who have both come in contact and also had this disease, I have a number of objections to his philosophy First of all, he in his Introduction, wrote that he was going to share in the human stories of the patients he met and treated in Liberia, a promise which he did little to fulfill Secondly, this book was all about Dr Hatch There was so much usage of the word I that again seemed to come up against his promise t 2.5 starsWhile I give Dr Hatch full credit for his dedication to helping those who have both come in contact and also had this disease, I have a number of objections to his philosophy First of all, he in his Introduction, wrote that he was going to share in the human stories of the patients he met and treated in Liberia, a promise which he did little to fulfill Secondly, this book was all about Dr Hatch There was so much usage of the word I that again seemed to come up against his promise that this book was not really about him Again I do say that it took a whole lot of courage to place oneself in the midst and treat patients of an Ebola outbreak, but I, as the reader, wanted to know of the people who were affected and it is not till the end of the book, that things are mentioned that are being done to support the survivors and the families of those who did not survive.Another issue I had with Dr Hatch s analysis was that he looked with scorn on the effects that the US officials and politicians wished to convey in order that the people in this country remained safe from an Ebola outbreak In my book, it is always better to be safe than sorry Since Ebola has an extremely large percentage of killing people, I felt any effort even if it was over the top to see that Americans were kept safe wasthan warranted Dr Hatch seemed to think that we or at least those in charge of such things over reacted Another point that bothered me was the fact that Dr Hatch drew a correspondence between measles and Ebola pointing out that it was harder to catch Ebola than the measles The idea I kept in my mind was thatpeople have survived measles than have survived Ebola Of course if at any time, scientists come up with a vaccine to prevent Ebola, then perhaps Dr Hatch s ideas has merit.So, to say I was disappointed in this novel was an understatement and as I write this review I read this morning that there is new Ebola breakout in the Congo I ve been itching to read a first hand account of the Ebola outbreak in Western Africa Hearing Dr Hatch in a CBC radio interview provided the gateway to Inferno Some uncomfortable thoughts that I am now contending with that Hatch is insightful enough to point out 1 Am I fascinated by diseases like Ebola and Henda because of their otherness and by this same token is it because of some internalized racisim and fear of the African other 2 Am I merely playing disease tourist through books I ve been itching to read a first hand account of the Ebola outbreak in Western Africa Hearing Dr Hatch in a CBC radio interview provided the gateway to Inferno Some uncomfortable thoughts that I am now contending with that Hatch is insightful enough to point out 1 Am I fascinated by diseases like Ebola and Henda because of their otherness and by this same token is it because of some internalized racisim and fear of the African other 2 Am I merely playing disease tourist through books and news articles And how is that serving the greater good Hatch, struggles with a lot of internal angst Not surprisingly An accounting of the state of public health from a Liberian s pov would be incredible, but of course, what major publisher would take a chance on thatis the shame This up close and personal account of the 2014 Ebola outbreak provides intriguing new to me information about the pathology of the disease and the ways in which it affects even those whom it doesn t infect Dr Hatch s occasional injections of humor, however, weren t enough to keep the book from dragging, at times, and there were too many people introduced for this reader to feel connected to any of them. Shattering partial memoir of an American doctor s experiences after he volunteered to aid Liberia in the Ebola outbreak of 2014 good background on Liberia s history and contemporary problems of poverty and societal breakdown in the aftermath of years of civil war and disturbance and the cultural difficulties regarding funerary arrangements that led to the epidemic spreading from Guinea to Liberia and Sierra Leone The courage of the doctors, nurses and medical workers from Liberia and many othe Shattering partial memoir of an American doctor s experiences after he volunteered to aid Liberia in the Ebola outbreak of 2014 good background on Liberia s history and contemporary problems of poverty and societal breakdown in the aftermath of years of civil war and disturbance and the cultural difficulties regarding funerary arrangements that led to the epidemic spreading from Guinea to Liberia and Sierra Leone The courage of the doctors, nurses and medical workers from Liberia and many other countries is astounding, all battling the disease where it was never thought to exist, previous outbreaks had been in the Congo Disturbing reading, not for the faint hearted Very interesting story from the front lines of the Ebola crisis and fight in Liberia in 2013 2015.Although I did enjoy much of the book, I did not enjoy Dr Hatch s at times arrogant tone nor did I enjoy his denigration of those with opposing political, and other, points of view I do greatly admire Dr Hatch for his service and sacrifice I would prefer, however, that he leave the divisive commentary out.Even though I was at times offended, I would still read another of his works because I do t Very interesting story from the front lines of the Ebola crisis and fight in Liberia in 2013 2015.Although I did enjoy much of the book, I did not enjoy Dr Hatch s at times arrogant tone nor did I enjoy his denigration of those with opposing political, and other, points of view I do greatly admire Dr Hatch for his service and sacrifice I would prefer, however, that he leave the divisive commentary out.Even though I was at times offended, I would still read another of his works because I do think that he has valuable things to say.So, the bottom line.Would I recommend this book Yes, absolutely Even when someone s viewpoint is different than mine I can usually find good parts, many times many good parts, to apprehend for improving my mind and my character This book fits the bill I was not sure if I would like this book, since I felt the introduction was trying to explain everything even before I started reading Fortunately, I have almost finished and am glad I did I like that there is not an explanation of the symptoms, i.e., blood and guts, that is over the top I appreciate that this is an account of the people who were affected by this, meaning the patients, doctors, world, etc.Someone said there were too many I statements Well, DUH , the doctor is writing about I was not sure if I would like this book, since I felt the introduction was trying to explain everything even before I started reading Fortunately, I have almost finished and am glad I did I like that there is not an explanation of the symptoms, i.e., blood and guts, that is over the top I appreciate that this is an account of the people who were affected by this, meaning the patients, doctors, world, etc.Someone said there were too many I statements Well, DUH , the doctor is writing about his experience, so why wouldn t there be.I have thoroughly enjoyed reading this, not enjoying the tragedy but understanding the epidemic and the effect on others.I highly recommend this book I won this book off Goodread s First Reads Giveaways I don t even like nonfiction, and I really liked this book I learned quite a bit about the 2014 Ebola outbreak in Liberia Very fascinating to get a first hand account from this brave doctor. Not gonna lie I struggled with this book It brought up a lot of feelings from my evacuation from Guinea Especially the descriptions of how he felt when he was back in the states after his first stint in the ETU Overall It isn t the most well written book that I ve ever read but that almost made itrelatable It readslike your friend telling you about their experiences in Liberia I thought it was a great balance between describing the medical and scientific realities of being i Not gonna lie I struggled with this book It brought up a lot of feelings from my evacuation from Guinea Especially the descriptions of how he felt when he was back in the states after his first stint in the ETU Overall It isn t the most well written book that I ve ever read but that almost made itrelatable It readslike your friend telling you about their experiences in Liberia I thought it was a great balance between describing the medical and scientific realities of being in the hot zone with the talking about the people and culture of Liberia Seeing as those are two things I m passionate about I clearly enjoyed the book

Inferno: A Doctor's Ebola Story MOBI ✓ Doctor's
    This guide aims to show you how to download Ebola how it is transmitted and spreads with such ferocity And as Dr Hatch notes, while Ebola is temporarily under control, it will inevitably re emerge as will other plagues, notably the Zika virus, which the World Health Organization has declared a public health emergency Inferno is a glimpse into the white hot center of a crisis A Doctor's Ebola PDF ↠ that will come again. I have a small connection with Liberia A customer was the US expert on Liberia and he found a book in my shop on Liberia that he had never seen before He didn t buy it, too heavy to take home but it turned him into a friend and I was on the cruise ship history tours, not four meals a day plus midnight buffet ones list of 100 best Indie bookshops The author says that the founding of Liberia for free American Blacks wasn t quite the utopian enterprise a lot of us believe it was For a start t I have a small connection with Liberia A customer was the US expert on Liberia and he found a book in my shop on Liberia that he had never seen before He didn t buy it, too heavy to take home but it turned him into a friend and I was on the cruise ship history tours, not four meals a day plus midnight buffet ones list of 100 best Indie bookshops The author says that the founding of Liberia for free American Blacks wasn t quite the utopian enterprise a lot of us believe it was For a start the only desirable part of Liberia had been annexed by the British Secondly, returning free Blacks to Liberia as if Liberia was all of Africa when their ancestors might have been sold from any part of the continent made no sense Thirdly, these free Blacks were living good lives in the Northern states They were tradesmen and craftsmen, they were middle class, they were educated, they were doing well But much as the North cared about slavery in general, they didn t care about it as it applied to individuals, not at all So the free Blacks lived in constant threat of being kidnapped and sold into Slavery in the South That was why they left And the local Liberians didn t welcome these Americans at all To a racist, sharing a Black skin, made them all the same, but of course their culture was completely different.What was so ironic was that the economy, in tatters when they arrived in Liberia, had been built entirely on capturing and selling slaves I don t know how muchof this book I can stand The author doesn t leave a single thing out, and describes not only what he does, such as including where he bought a usb power strip and what was wrong with it, but also how he felt about it, how he discussed it, his tone of voice and the level off difficulty He has the passion and the black white view of the world I did at 17 I admire him for maintaining it and where it matters, like a potted history of Liberia and slavery it was interesting Otherwise, it could have been cut down to 25% and might have been a good book And a short one I m over 50% in and think that s it.But outside of the over detail, it s actually a good book, so as not to put off those withfortitude than me, I will give it 3 stars Emile Ouamouno fell ill in late December 2013 Nobody knows what his precise symptoms were because hardly anyone who cared for him is left alive. 20 It seems strange that the Ebola crisis, which dominated the news for so long, is but a memory for most people in the Western world now I followed it pretty closely and was eager to see what books came out of this.Hatch is an American doctor, but he found his way to Liberia to do what he could as soon as he understood the severity of the crisis Un Emile Ouamouno fell ill in late December 2013 Nobody knows what his precise symptoms were because hardly anyone who cared for him is left alive. 20 It seems strange that the Ebola crisis, which dominated the news for so long, is but a memory for most people in the Western world now I followed it pretty closely and was eager to see what books came out of this.Hatch is an American doctor, but he found his way to Liberia to do what he could as soon as he understood the severity of the crisis Understand Ebola is not new, but the way it spread in Liberia and other parts of West Africa was new there wasn t really a road map for this.This isn t really Hatch s story He says early on that he chose to keep the book focused on the disease and on the people battling it, and that he does, only occasionally talking about things likewell, like leaving his family behind to go on what he thought was effectively a suicide mission and then the discombobulation of realising that he probably wasn t going to contract Ebola But he has some wonderful insights into what was going on, both on a small scale and on a broader scale Take this In terms of diagnostics, the ETU Ebola Treatment Unit practiced twenty first century medicine for Ebola and nineteenth century medicine for everything else At the time I arrived in Liberia, there was no functioning health care system besides ETUs Essentially all the hospitals and clinics were closed So these people who were brought in but tested negative for Ebola in some sense represented all the otherconditions that were being ignored in the midst of the Ebola crisis It wasn t merely killing the people it infected it was killing people who were dying of everything else that could be treated, since there was nowhere to turn. 83 Elsewhere, he talks about the relationship people in the area have with the hospital In the coming days I made inquiries about the mortality rate at JFK the hospital , and my mind reeled Oh, it s about 40 percent, Ian told me, almost with the casual air of someone who had been following the price of Apple s stock The problem is that people know that if you go to JFK, you ve got a pretty good chance of dying, so they delay coming when we might be able to makeof a difference, and then they end up coming so far along in their illness that they don t do well, and you have this high mortality rate, which reinforces the sense that you come here to die The mortality on the surgical service in 2013, according to the residents with whom I spoke, was an astonishing 70 percent , for much the same reasons. 41 42 I m reminded of Edward Hume, who talks about opening a hospital in China in the early 1900s and understanding that, to gain the trust of the people his hospital aimed to serve, the hospital would have to go two years without any patient deaths in hospital, which meant treating only minor maladies for a long time I don t suppose that s an option that JFK had or has, but the cyclical nature of it all is so terribly sad.I m curious about this, too I thought a lot about fluids in particular, intravenous fluids If, as my own two eyes had shown me, Ebola was a disease closer in appearance to severe gastroenteritis than it was to a river of blood being unleashed, then giving back as much fluid as possible might take a disease with a 50 to 70 percent mortality and turn it into one with a 10 to 20 percent mortality. 241 I wondered something along those lines, back when the Ebola crisis was hitting a fever pitch The Westerners who contracted Ebola and were evacuated or contracted it back home it s impossible for me as a layperson, not a medical professional, not a researcher, etc to know how much difference the Ebola specific treatments made and how much difference basic things like hydration made, but I m reminded of cholera, with which patients have a vastly better chance of survival if they re properly hydrated I m really the wrong person to hypothesise about this see above re not being a doctor or researcher or whatever , but I hope the research that comes out of this outbreak can answer a lot of questions.But back to the book Nicely thorough and thoughtful I learned a lot, and outside a couple of history dense sections, it was a really engaging read Recommended to anyone interested in the topic 2.5 starsWhile I give Dr Hatch full credit for his dedication to helping those who have both come in contact and also had this disease, I have a number of objections to his philosophy First of all, he in his Introduction, wrote that he was going to share in the human stories of the patients he met and treated in Liberia, a promise which he did little to fulfill Secondly, this book was all about Dr Hatch There was so much usage of the word I that again seemed to come up against his promise t 2.5 starsWhile I give Dr Hatch full credit for his dedication to helping those who have both come in contact and also had this disease, I have a number of objections to his philosophy First of all, he in his Introduction, wrote that he was going to share in the human stories of the patients he met and treated in Liberia, a promise which he did little to fulfill Secondly, this book was all about Dr Hatch There was so much usage of the word I that again seemed to come up against his promise that this book was not really about him Again I do say that it took a whole lot of courage to place oneself in the midst and treat patients of an Ebola outbreak, but I, as the reader, wanted to know of the people who were affected and it is not till the end of the book, that things are mentioned that are being done to support the survivors and the families of those who did not survive.Another issue I had with Dr Hatch s analysis was that he looked with scorn on the effects that the US officials and politicians wished to convey in order that the people in this country remained safe from an Ebola outbreak In my book, it is always better to be safe than sorry Since Ebola has an extremely large percentage of killing people, I felt any effort even if it was over the top to see that Americans were kept safe wasthan warranted Dr Hatch seemed to think that we or at least those in charge of such things over reacted Another point that bothered me was the fact that Dr Hatch drew a correspondence between measles and Ebola pointing out that it was harder to catch Ebola than the measles The idea I kept in my mind was thatpeople have survived measles than have survived Ebola Of course if at any time, scientists come up with a vaccine to prevent Ebola, then perhaps Dr Hatch s ideas has merit.So, to say I was disappointed in this novel was an understatement and as I write this review I read this morning that there is new Ebola breakout in the Congo I ve been itching to read a first hand account of the Ebola outbreak in Western Africa Hearing Dr Hatch in a CBC radio interview provided the gateway to Inferno Some uncomfortable thoughts that I am now contending with that Hatch is insightful enough to point out 1 Am I fascinated by diseases like Ebola and Henda because of their otherness and by this same token is it because of some internalized racisim and fear of the African other 2 Am I merely playing disease tourist through books I ve been itching to read a first hand account of the Ebola outbreak in Western Africa Hearing Dr Hatch in a CBC radio interview provided the gateway to Inferno Some uncomfortable thoughts that I am now contending with that Hatch is insightful enough to point out 1 Am I fascinated by diseases like Ebola and Henda because of their otherness and by this same token is it because of some internalized racisim and fear of the African other 2 Am I merely playing disease tourist through books and news articles And how is that serving the greater good Hatch, struggles with a lot of internal angst Not surprisingly An accounting of the state of public health from a Liberian s pov would be incredible, but of course, what major publisher would take a chance on thatis the shame This up close and personal account of the 2014 Ebola outbreak provides intriguing new to me information about the pathology of the disease and the ways in which it affects even those whom it doesn t infect Dr Hatch s occasional injections of humor, however, weren t enough to keep the book from dragging, at times, and there were too many people introduced for this reader to feel connected to any of them. Shattering partial memoir of an American doctor s experiences after he volunteered to aid Liberia in the Ebola outbreak of 2014 good background on Liberia s history and contemporary problems of poverty and societal breakdown in the aftermath of years of civil war and disturbance and the cultural difficulties regarding funerary arrangements that led to the epidemic spreading from Guinea to Liberia and Sierra Leone The courage of the doctors, nurses and medical workers from Liberia and many othe Shattering partial memoir of an American doctor s experiences after he volunteered to aid Liberia in the Ebola outbreak of 2014 good background on Liberia s history and contemporary problems of poverty and societal breakdown in the aftermath of years of civil war and disturbance and the cultural difficulties regarding funerary arrangements that led to the epidemic spreading from Guinea to Liberia and Sierra Leone The courage of the doctors, nurses and medical workers from Liberia and many other countries is astounding, all battling the disease where it was never thought to exist, previous outbreaks had been in the Congo Disturbing reading, not for the faint hearted Very interesting story from the front lines of the Ebola crisis and fight in Liberia in 2013 2015.Although I did enjoy much of the book, I did not enjoy Dr Hatch s at times arrogant tone nor did I enjoy his denigration of those with opposing political, and other, points of view I do greatly admire Dr Hatch for his service and sacrifice I would prefer, however, that he leave the divisive commentary out.Even though I was at times offended, I would still read another of his works because I do t Very interesting story from the front lines of the Ebola crisis and fight in Liberia in 2013 2015.Although I did enjoy much of the book, I did not enjoy Dr Hatch s at times arrogant tone nor did I enjoy his denigration of those with opposing political, and other, points of view I do greatly admire Dr Hatch for his service and sacrifice I would prefer, however, that he leave the divisive commentary out.Even though I was at times offended, I would still read another of his works because I do think that he has valuable things to say.So, the bottom line.Would I recommend this book Yes, absolutely Even when someone s viewpoint is different than mine I can usually find good parts, many times many good parts, to apprehend for improving my mind and my character This book fits the bill I was not sure if I would like this book, since I felt the introduction was trying to explain everything even before I started reading Fortunately, I have almost finished and am glad I did I like that there is not an explanation of the symptoms, i.e., blood and guts, that is over the top I appreciate that this is an account of the people who were affected by this, meaning the patients, doctors, world, etc.Someone said there were too many I statements Well, DUH , the doctor is writing about I was not sure if I would like this book, since I felt the introduction was trying to explain everything even before I started reading Fortunately, I have almost finished and am glad I did I like that there is not an explanation of the symptoms, i.e., blood and guts, that is over the top I appreciate that this is an account of the people who were affected by this, meaning the patients, doctors, world, etc.Someone said there were too many I statements Well, DUH , the doctor is writing about his experience, so why wouldn t there be.I have thoroughly enjoyed reading this, not enjoying the tragedy but understanding the epidemic and the effect on others.I highly recommend this book I won this book off Goodread s First Reads Giveaways I don t even like nonfiction, and I really liked this book I learned quite a bit about the 2014 Ebola outbreak in Liberia Very fascinating to get a first hand account from this brave doctor. Not gonna lie I struggled with this book It brought up a lot of feelings from my evacuation from Guinea Especially the descriptions of how he felt when he was back in the states after his first stint in the ETU Overall It isn t the most well written book that I ve ever read but that almost made itrelatable It readslike your friend telling you about their experiences in Liberia I thought it was a great balance between describing the medical and scientific realities of being i Not gonna lie I struggled with this book It brought up a lot of feelings from my evacuation from Guinea Especially the descriptions of how he felt when he was back in the states after his first stint in the ETU Overall It isn t the most well written book that I ve ever read but that almost made itrelatable It readslike your friend telling you about their experiences in Liberia I thought it was a great balance between describing the medical and scientific realities of being in the hot zone with the talking about the people and culture of Liberia Seeing as those are two things I m passionate about I clearly enjoyed the book "/>
  • Hardcover
  • 320 pages
  • Inferno: A Doctor's Ebola Story
  • Steven Hatch
  • 09 August 2018
  • 1250085136