Jucătoarea de go

Jucătoarea de go[Reading] ➽ Jucătoarea de go Author Shan Sa – Oaklandjobs.co.uk n pia a unui or el amenin at de r zboi din Manciuria anilor , o t n r chinezoaic i un ofi er japonez i g sesc lini tea i echilibrul interior n fa a tablei de go nchipuind strategii de joc complicate, n pia a unui or el amenin at de r zboi din Manciuria anilor , o t n r chinezoaic i un ofi er japonez i g sesc lini tea i echilibrul interior n fa a tablei de go nchipuind strategii de joc complicate, cele dou personaje i descoper f r cuvinte cele mai ascunse unghere ale min Jucătoarea de PDF \ ii ntre ele se nfirip o iubire pe c t de neverosimil , pe at t de puternic , n stare s nving chiar moartea i s d inuie n lumea tenebrelor. If you re familiar with Kawabata s The Master of Go, it s impossible to read Shan Sa s book without thinking about it on every page Kawabata, in subtle, elliptical prose, describes a real Go match which he covered as a young reporter working for a Japanese newspaper He reorganized his match reports as a novel, where the symbolic aspects of the game gradually come to the fore the Master represents the old Japan, his brash young challenger the new Western culture that was destroying its soul T If you re familiar with Kawabata s The Master of Go, it s impossible to read Shan Sa s book without thinking about it on every page Kawabata, in subtle, elliptical prose, describes a real Go match which he covered as a young reporter working for a Japanese newspaper He reorganized his match reports as a novel, where the symbolic aspects of the game gradually come to the fore the Master represents the old Japan, his brash young challenger the new Western culture that was destroying its soul The game itself is central to the story Kawabata, himself a strong amateur player, understands all the nuances, and does a magnificent job of conveying them to the reader both the moves themselves, and their deeper meaning It is a unique work of art.If I hadn t read Kawabata, I m guessing that I would have liked this bookUnfortunately, it s all too clear that Shan Sa has adapted the formula without really understanding it The book, set in the Manchuria of the 30s, is again organized around a Go game, this time between a young Japanese officer and a 16 year old Chinese girl I am happy to concede the author s technical skill in some respects Writing in a language not her own, she does a good job of crafting poetic touches which combine the characters of French and Oriental literature the illusion that one is reading Chinese or Japanese is sometimes quite strong The tragic storyline has some force.The problem is that Sa, unlike Kawabata, knows nothing about Go alas, this isn t optional, and the constant errors are after a while quite exasperating Maybe she thought that a Western audience wouldn t notice, but if so she s underestimating us For the morbidly curious, this page gives all the details Oh well As several people have suggested, it ll probably make a decent movie one day Ughhhhhhhhhhh this bleeegh i mean this book Ugh I want to inhabit a world built of Shan Sa s dreamy metaphors A woman is bathing in thermal springs, her body glistening under the water where it writhes and twists like a slender leaf, or The moon looks like a line of chalk drawn on the sky. Even her name a pen name has the alluring meaning rustle of the wind in the mountains.The author, born in Beijing, began writing poetry at age 6 and received her first national poetry award at 12 In her 20s she moved to Paris to study philosophy and app I want to inhabit a world built of Shan Sa s dreamy metaphors A woman is bathing in thermal springs, her body glistening under the water where it writhes and twists like a slender leaf, or The moon looks like a line of chalk drawn on the sky. Even her name a pen name has the alluring meaning rustle of the wind in the mountains.The author, born in Beijing, began writing poetry at age 6 and received her first national poetry award at 12 In her 20s she moved to Paris to study philosophy and apprentice with a Swiss painter, and began writing novels in French Her multi cultural artistic sensibility, with the help of an outstanding English translator, shines through in every sentence on the page.The novel is the parallel stories of a 15 year old girl in Japanese occupied Manchuria and a Japanese officer, in 1934, told through 92 short, alternating first person chapters The protagonists meet daily in a public park to play the game of Go, though they rarely speak and don t know each other s name or history Against the common backdrop of the Japanese invasion of China, the stories of her sexual coming of age and his inner struggle between duty and desire, only converge near the end.Her writing reads like prose poetry, whittled down to the bare minimum, each word thoughtful and deliberate, in sentences which burst with sensuous energy She portrays the game of Go, played on a large checkerboard with smooth round black and white stones The chequered board is a violent sea with white and black waves chasing and crashing into each other Towards the four shores they draw back, spin around and head for the skies But where they mingle, they clash and come together in a fierce embrace.The sight of a bombarded building in which the girl s lover has died is made all thehorrible by showing her first glimpse in a single terse sentence The windows with their shattered panes are dark as the mouths of animal lairs.I feel like framing the sentence in which the Japanese soldier describes the very first smile he receives from the girl Her mouth opens with all the irresistible power of a grenade exploding.Too many similes and metaphors packed into a novel can overwhelm and detract from the story, but Shan Sa doesn t do this Although there are a lot of them, each one teems with emotion and fits perfectly within the context Plus they re so gorgeous I keep looking forward to the next one.I remain a not so secret admirer, in love with her language I can t imagine this book being as good as it was if I wasn t a go fan Which you can play right here or here Many of the axioms of Go were brought out in the book life imitates Go, Go imitates life being the key one.Others include your enemies move is your move keep both alive, for if one dies, neither are any good a captured territory switches sides etcThe book also makes reference to many of the etiquette aspects of the game, such as placing a starting stone next to an opponents I can t imagine this book being as good as it was if I wasn t a go fan Which you can play right here or here Many of the axioms of Go were brought out in the book life imitates Go, Go imitates life being the key one.Others include your enemies move is your move keep both alive, for if one dies, neither are any good a captured territory switches sides etcThe book also makes reference to many of the etiquette aspects of the game, such as placing a starting stone next to an opponents starting stone, and the proper way of holding the stones between index and middle fingers The two characters in the book playing the game represent the white and black sides of a go board I realize that the girl went first, black , but I still think her character fits the character of the white stones They end up playing each other, but not until about halfway through the book Like Go There are minor battles off to the side that they are each fighting, but their battle is the main one.I thought that near the end, you could tell where the game actually ended too There s a point in most Go games where both sides know it s over and you re just tying up the loose ends The game doesn t officially end though until both sides pass.I understand that the Go board represented virgin land waiting to be taken, but for me, that part of the book was over done I only read that it was about a sexual awakening after I d checked it out of the library, so I understand that that was my fault but there sure was a lot of sex The Girl Who Played Go by Shan Sa has a story laid out like a game of go Each chapter is like a new move Song of the Night, a young Manchurian girl plays the black side while the Japanese soldier takes the white Anyone familiar with the game or with the history of Japan s invasion of China will know that this book won t be a happy one.As with a game of go, the two characters don t meet or interact until half way through the book page 127 As pieces are laid at opposite corners the soldier a The Girl Who Played Go by Shan Sa has a story laid out like a game of go Each chapter is like a new move Song of the Night, a young Manchurian girl plays the black side while the Japanese soldier takes the white Anyone familiar with the game or with the history of Japan s invasion of China will know that this book won t be a happy one.As with a game of go, the two characters don t meet or interact until half way through the book page 127 As pieces are laid at opposite corners the soldier and the student seem to have very separate lives save for their shared interest in go Once they meet in the middle the book s disjointed plot finally comes together and the story goes from a false sense of light heartedness towards a tragic confrontation at breakneck speed The second half can be read in half the time I loved the dramatic ending. In a small town in Manchuria in the 1930s, a 16 year old girl isconcerned with her daily game of go and her fledgling romantic relationship with a dissident student, than she is with the potential for war with Japan She is a master at the game, surprising for one so young and a girl, no less One day a stranger challenges her Their game continues for days they rarely speak, never introduce themselves, and she does not know that he is a Japanese soldier in disguise The novel is told i In a small town in Manchuria in the 1930s, a 16 year old girl isconcerned with her daily game of go and her fledgling romantic relationship with a dissident student, than she is with the potential for war with Japan She is a master at the game, surprising for one so young and a girl, no less One day a stranger challenges her Their game continues for days they rarely speak, never introduce themselves, and she does not know that he is a Japanese soldier in disguise The novel is told in alternating points of view, yet both are related in first person It took me a few chapters to get into the rhythm of the work, but the author remains consistent first the girl, then the soldier The chapters are short and I had little trouble telling which character was narrating I m glad that Shan Sa included footnotes on the Japanese and Chinese history, because my own education in this is woefully lacking I wish I understoodabout the game of go, though I do know that it is a game of strategy What really shines in the novel, however, is how the characters come to life The reader witnesses the headlong rush of first love, the despair of a broken relationship, the longing for understanding and or deeper connection, the yearning for home, the desire to break away, the realization of a misguided decision I was engrossed in their lives, and completely stunned by the ending This is a tragic love story that ends brutally Shan Sa s novel doesn t seem to have lost much in the translation from French to English the voices of the two protagonists are beautifully rendered, one male and one female I was a little dubious about a female literary romance author writing a male character from a first person POV, but the Japanese soldier is believable, flawed and a little vulnerable but still mostly full of sex and violence Still, it s the Chinese girl who really comes aliv This is a tragic love story that ends brutally Shan Sa s novel doesn t seem to have lost much in the translation from French to English the voices of the two protagonists are beautifully rendered, one male and one female I was a little dubious about a female literary romance author writing a male character from a first person POV, but the Japanese soldier is believable, flawed and a little vulnerable but still mostly full of sex and violence Still, it s the Chinese girl who really comes alive and whose inner life is explored in detail We get her thoughts and reactions and everything she does seems understandable, but while the Japanese soldier s voice takes up just as much of the book, and we get flashbacks to some of his formative experiences an awful lot of which have to do with sex , the inner workings of his mind areof a mystery It did feel as if Shan Sa tried to render each in equal detail and complexity, but ultimately found men as impenetrable as the soldier claims women to be.Nonetheless, it s a good book with a sad but swift moving story about a sixteen year old girl who plays go to escape from the world which is closing in around her She goes to a school where some of her classmates are urging resistance against the Japanese occupiers she falls in love with a boy who joins the resistance Meanwhile, at the village square where she goes to play go each afternoon, she meets a mysterious stranger who sits down to play with her This, we learn, is a Japanese soldier in disguise, sent to spy on the Chinese townspeople to try to ferret out terrorists among them The two of them play go and each day the game tells themabout one another.Since this is a war story with the two would be lovers on opposite sides, it can t end well, and you know right from the beginning that it will be a tragedy the only uncertainty is just what form the tragic ending will take.Although this may be a romance, romance is a bit of a misnomer There s definitely no happy ever after, and there is muchgoing on with both characters than their lovers though there is quite a bit of sex in this book It sof a literary historical novel with elements of romance and tragedy and a bit of go.The last point was probably my major disappointment the book is written in short alternating chapters, from the girl s POV and the soldier s POV, symbolic of their alternating moves in the game, but unless there was some additional extraordinary subtlety that I just missed, go never really was muchthan a plot device I was hoping to see it fully realized as a metaphor for the story, possibly even as something that would drive the story, but if you re reading this book for go references, you ll find it pretty thin the go game, in the end, is pretty meaningless.It s still a pretty good though definitely not a feel good story, and it s a short book with chapters that fly by, so if you like the time period, go, the general theme, or just want to sample something literary that isn t completely full of itself Shan Sa is apparently something of a big deal in France, and her writing shows great craftsmanship without wordiness, and translates well , it s definitely worth checking out When I think of the work of Shan Sa s I previously read, Empress, I remember fragments of a voracious dream, the sort of imaginings where the lust for what is already achieved is never sated, and visions of immortality and impregnable fates can never be afforded by mortal means This was a woman s story I much enjoyed with its sinking into history and pleasing, translated turns of phrase, so when I came across Sa s higher rated work, I couldn t resist I can see why this workfavorable made When I think of the work of Shan Sa s I previously read, Empress, I remember fragments of a voracious dream, the sort of imaginings where the lust for what is already achieved is never sated, and visions of immortality and impregnable fates can never be afforded by mortal means This was a woman s story I much enjoyed with its sinking into history and pleasing, translated turns of phrase, so when I came across Sa s higher rated work, I couldn t resist I can see why this workfavorable made its way to the masses with itsrecent history, its splicing together brief flits of gendered narrative, its burst of violence and sex culminating in a dramatically brutal, even poetic, ending Such machinations don t do much for me, however, as I prefer being given time to think upon and puzzle out the blurred out landscapes of prose with slow urges and even slower revenge, rather than being thurst upon a slap dash bang trail of tears and sperm and blood and other watery forms of human waste While I m glad that the author, despite hints to the contrary, held off on delving into the events of Nanking, what was written about never rose much above the level of tragedy porn it wasn t even, for the most part, luridly, beautifully written tragedy porn at that.The top review of this complains about a board game, which, ok, sure, if you re into that sort of thing Otherwise, go why it isn t referred to as yi or weiqi in Chinese grounded Manchuria is a puzzle, but I suppose it doesn t make for as clever an alliteration obtusely functions as a useful connector of unlikely bedfellows through the barbed wire borders of gender, nationality, and seriousness of purpose, and if in the end the connective tissue is valuedfor what results of said connections than the actual tissue itself, such as been the usual behavior of narratives since the beginning of their oral conception Moving on from structure to setting, authors will likely never stop picking at WWII and its precursors and successors for narrative foddder, so the trouble comes up when one work has to deal with all those competing at the same trough in order to be considered a truly engaging story As mentioned previously, I like my fiction slow, or at least passing over a long enough time so that I may grow attached to the characters or the world or the history before it is all torn away and thrown to the winds Thus I appreciated the factoids dropped every so often about Manchuria and Peking and the changing times of nobility and power reflected in a puppet king country, but I could ve usedof this and less high school machinations that, through coincidental international movements, turned deadly in their convolutions As with the last book I read, this lack of engagement on my part is perhaps a sign of my getting old, but what can I say You can only pack so much drama and blood in a story that doesn t work very hard to build connections between reader and its world before it gets a little much.Another lackluster continuum of the remains of 2017 s choices, wherein taking a chance on a familiar name didn t pay out as it had elsewhere It helps to know what one likes and to seek it out accordingly, but there s many an aged cover that I still haven t gotten to on my shelves, and my myriad challenges juxtaposed in overlap with each other were set in hopes of preventing the still untouched old from sinking once again under the weight of shiny surface tension new, so easy to remember and pluck from the stacks when the time is ripe Four days in and no results handed back, I can t say yet which direction this year is turning towards, although the Time s Up Movement is worthy of being hopeful for In any case, it s time to pack up and move on, hopefully tomeditative fields than these Inequality continues beyond the grave. This book is a tale told in dream like prose Life, love, betrayal and death all float by in short lyrical chapters that seem to be recalled from the dreamer s memory.The story itself, while being compelling, isn t one that you haven t read before If you have ever watched any old black and white movie from the 1940s, you know the ultimate ending from page one but that isn t the point, the telling of the tale, like the game of the title, is about construction and the patterns made life and ar This book is a tale told in dream like prose Life, love, betrayal and death all float by in short lyrical chapters that seem to be recalled from the dreamer s memory.The story itself, while being compelling, isn t one that you haven t read before If you have ever watched any old black and white movie from the 1940s, you know the ultimate ending from page one but that isn t the point, the telling of the tale, like the game of the title, is about construction and the patterns made life and art If the universe is contained upon the surface of a Go board, than the scope of human emotions and relations are pretty much all contained within this book This small tale is told within the context of a greater historical event in this case the Japanese invasion of Manchuria but like the game itself, the final shape and totality of those cosmic events are only composed of tiny pieces played one at a time at single points and places.This is one of those books that Hollywood will probably want to make a movie of and if they do, it most likely will be very successful However, they will never be able to match the fragile verbiage that make this book so moving and memorable even when telling of violence, carnage and death