Samuraiul

Samuraiul[EPUB] ✺ Samuraiul By Shūsaku Endō – Oaklandjobs.co.uk Considerat unul dintre cele mai reu ite romane ale lui Shusaku Endo, Samuraiul surprinde momentul persecu iei cre tine n Japonia, povestind i aventurile primilor japonezi ce p esc n Europa Dintre emis Considerat unul dintre cele mai reu ite romane ale lui Shusaku Endo, Samuraiul surprinde momentul persecu iei cre tine n Japonia, povestind i aventurile primilor japonezi ce p esc n Europa Dintre emisarii trimi i de Japonia npentru tratative fac parte un misionar franciscan stabilit n Japonia un personaj ambi ios, care sper s ob in o serie de privilegii pentru a i nfiin a propriul ordin la ntoarcerea n ar i Samuraiul Rokuemon Hasekura C l toria, dificil , primejdioas i foarte lung , se dovede te a fi un e ec Dezn d jduit, Samuraiul Rokuemon afl sprijin i consolare doar n fa a unui dumnezeu cre tin c ruia nu tie dac i se va nchina vreodat. The Samurai is even better that Endo s better known work, Silence As much as I was moved by that novel about Spanish and Japanese martyrs, it was hard to imagine another book which could be so good The Samurai starts off very slow and the characters seem one dimensional The samurai of the book s title is a simple peasant farmer He and his companions hardly know why they ve been chosen for this expedition and yet they also know better than to argue The Catholic priest assigned as interprete The Samurai is even better that Endo s better known work, Silence As much as I was moved by that novel about Spanish and Japanese martyrs, it was hard to imagine another book which could be so good The Samurai starts off very slow and the characters seem one dimensional The samurai of the book s title is a simple peasant farmer He and his companions hardly know why they ve been chosen for this expedition and yet they also know better than to argue The Catholic priest assigned as interpreter for the voyage is ambitious, zealous, and officious No good seems possible from such a hopeless undertaking certainly not the varied objectives sought by all those who set off for Mexico The journey takes on a life of its own and one by one the men have to surrender some cherished ideal in order to continue Shusaku Endo likes to portray the complexity of Life, human personalities, the clash of cultures, Time and beliefs especially during the early years of Christian missionary efforts to his own beloved Japan He wants to challenge our comfortable beliefs His writing is stunning and beautiful in its very understated simplicity Like Silence, The Samurai is a fictionalized account of a real story Highly recommended Endo s prose and imagery resembles the technical perfection of Japanese lacquer ware polished and graceful, The Sumarai charts the story of Father Velasco, a nuanced and complex character whose drive to proselytise Japan, driven as much by egomania as by piousness, leads to him becoming entrapped in a web of political machinations.The story is told via the perspective of two narrators father Velasco and the Japanese Samurai Hasekura Hasekura s narrative often concentrates on his surrounding Endo s prose and imagery resembles the technical perfection of Japanese lacquer ware polished and graceful, The Sumarai charts the story of Father Velasco, a nuanced and complex character whose drive to proselytise Japan, driven as much by egomania as by piousness, leads to him becoming entrapped in a web of political machinations.The story is told via the perspective of two narrators father Velasco and the Japanese Samurai Hasekura Hasekura s narrative often concentrates on his surroundings, whether it is the verdant and vibrant Japanese countryside or the stifling and discombobulating Mexico heat, or the slow falling snow over a dusk riddled river bed, Hasekura s narrative often concentrates on the wonders of the world around him Winter landscapes had greeted the samurai here before, but now flowers bloomed in profusion, and in fields peasants lazily prodded their oxen The following day, they saw the sea in the distance A warm spring sun was shining on the waves, and the clouds floating in the sky were as soft as cotton The samurai s narration is suffused with sadness There is an air of melancholy to his feeling of displacement, both in agreeing to the mission in order to regain his familial lands and in his journeys to Mexico, Spain and Italy Taken from the Japanese marshlands Hasekura feels the weight of the world on his shoulders, whether it be the endless ocean, the acrid heat of the Mexican desert or the ebullience of Christianity, Hasekura feels deeply alienated from the world he explores, he is constantly haunted by the images of swans who occupy the marshlands of his birth, who represent a kind of loss of innocence but spiritual awakening which Hasekura undergoes during the novel.Hasekura stands in stark contract to Father Velasco A naturally gregarious man who seeks to explore the world, his narration is dominated by a sense of foreboding and narcissism Father Velasco is driven by a sense of his own greatness, his muscular Christianity is dominated by his desire for renown Bishop of Japan and saviour of heathens, he sees himself as an apostle reborn Yet, mixed with this is genuine Christian humility and, at times generosity Contradictions abound in Father Velasco s character one the one hand he is contemptuous of the Japanese yet on the other he feels a deep affinity for both the land and the people In many ways Velasco is symbolic of the mindset of many colonialists they dress up their desire to dominate as altruism and seek to displace the very culture which they, often subconsciously, are drawn to.Indeed the clash of cultures is one of the central themes of The Samurai The reticent and insular nature of Japanese society means the the overly exuberant nature of European Christianity would never be an easy fit Endo is able to skilfully render the feelings and emotions of the Japanese emissaries and merchants who accompany Father Velasco, who increasingly feeling engulfed within a world which has no place for their introversion and mannerisms and who are gradually guided into disaster by a priest whose egoism blinds him to the futility of his own mission This novel was published in 1980 and is considered by some to be the best of the work of the Japanese writer, Shusaku Endo It is a book that I review hesitantly and with some trepidation, since it is a narrative that I am sure will appeal to many readers It did not to me.The plot is complex but can be rather simply summarized, although I leave the ending undisclosed so as not to spoil it for those who want to read it for themselves The story takes place in the early 17th century during a time This novel was published in 1980 and is considered by some to be the best of the work of the Japanese writer, Shusaku Endo It is a book that I review hesitantly and with some trepidation, since it is a narrative that I am sure will appeal to many readers It did not to me.The plot is complex but can be rather simply summarized, although I leave the ending undisclosed so as not to spoil it for those who want to read it for themselves The story takes place in the early 17th century during a time when the Jesuits had been proselytizing in Japan with uneven success The Pope then opened the country up to other religious orders and a rather fierce competition developed as to which order would have the most success Among the Japanese themselves there was much ambivalence about the arrival of Europeans, their desire to keep out Westerners existing in tension with a desire for the expansion of trade with the West In addition, there was competition between the Protestant English and Dutch, and the Catholic Spanish and Portuguese The samurai of the title, Rokuemon Hasekura, is of very low nobility, little above his own dependents in status or labor, and he is part of and content with the enduring system of hierarchy that has extended back as long as his family can remember Above all, loyalty to that hierarchy is of prime importance and is the foundation upon which his own value and dignity rest One day he and two other similar nobles are summoned by their lord and instructed to function as envoys on a voyage to Mexico, ostensibly to further trade relationships Thus begins a multi year journey that ends in failure before Hasekura returns home.The other prime character is Father Velasco, a Franciscan priest, who aspires to convert Japan to Christianity while also furthering his own ambition to become Bishop of Japan It is Velasco who has suggested and orchestrated this trade mission and who functions as the leader of the envoys, and he is a figure who takes advantage of the Japanese at every turn, rarely being honest with them but justifying all his actions on the basis of his desire to convert and this term is used loosely, baptism being all he really aspires to, viewing the counting of heads as being equivalent to the saving of souls, although he mouths religious and Biblical platitudes at every turn.The narrative delves into several issues, including the provincialism of the Japanese and the rigidity of their culture, the venality of the Roman Catholics and their willingness to subvert means to ends the ends not always being very admirable , and the contrast with asimple and, Endo would seem to argue,valid Christianity.The book itself is well organized, convincingly paced, and illustrative of the times and places with which it deals However, it becomes increasingly clear that it is a Christian apologia for Endo s own conversion and conviction, a polemic with a message, one of the things to which I most object in fiction, regardless of the perspective In reading this book, I increasingly felt Endo s determination emotionally to manipulate his reader, to argue for a particular religious perspective, and I felt ambushed and increasingly resentful of his so obvious strategy This is not a presentation that allows or even invites the reader to reflect and arrive at his own conclusions Rather, it presents the story in such a way that the reader feels bludgeoned to agree with the author It is my feeling that if an author has a perspective to communicate he has every right to do so, but intellectual or emotional manipulation is a cheap tactic More than sixty years ago I read Henryk Sienkiewicz s deplorable novel, Quo Vadis, which seemed to me similarly repugnant Am I glad that I read Endo s novel No The Samurai is basically good I should note though that I was somewhat disappointed by the style and the writing This is a story of two men, one a low status samurai and the other a Spanish Franciscan missionary who has dedicated his life to christianising Japan The story is both a struggle between the two and their cultures and a coming together of their points of view to some degree What disappointed me was the fact that, although written by Japanese writer, the writing felt very Western The Samurai is basically good I should note though that I was somewhat disappointed by the style and the writing This is a story of two men, one a low status samurai and the other a Spanish Franciscan missionary who has dedicated his life to christianising Japan The story is both a struggle between the two and their cultures and a coming together of their points of view to some degree What disappointed me was the fact that, although written by Japanese writer, the writing felt very Western It showed none of the slow development, attention to physical detail, nor focus on family that all attract me to Japanese writers Some of this may be attributed to the translation but I would argue that Sh saku End has very much mastered a Western writing style, so much so that, for me, he does not create those sensations that I turn to Japanese literature for that palate cleansing that my Friend Marita describes This is a marvelous work of historical fiction I was interested to learn about the lead up to the Edo period of Japan This was a time of three of Japan s most important leaders, Nobunaga, Toyotomi and Tokugawa, who were responsible for unifying Japan This was also when Japan shut out foreign influences and extirpated all the vestiges of Christianity This was a time of Shoguns, daimyos and samurais It was an interesting introduction to Japanese history, culture and religion But the story is This is a marvelous work of historical fiction I was interested to learn about the lead up to the Edo period of Japan This was a time of three of Japan s most important leaders, Nobunaga, Toyotomi and Tokugawa, who were responsible for unifying Japan This was also when Japan shut out foreign influences and extirpated all the vestiges of Christianity This was a time of Shoguns, daimyos and samurais It was an interesting introduction to Japanese history, culture and religion But the story isthan that.Four low ranking samurai are chosen as envoys for an important mission to forge ties with the Spanish It was a risky gambit, to invite proselytizing missionaries to come to Japan at a time when Christians were being persecuted This was in exchange for a chance to establish trade with the technologicallyadvanced Spanish So these four pawns embarked on a perilous journey,than halfway across the world They saw sights and met people which no other Japanese had met before Not only were they pushed to their physical limits, but they were forced to compromise on their honour, beliefs, even their very souls view spoiler The story starts on a desperate and depressing note There is a sense of disenfranchisement and inevitability for the samurais and their families They were inveigled into accepting a supposedly important mission, with a hope of repossessing the estates which their families had lost The four samurai were trapped individuals They were bound to serve the interests of their families and bound to serve their Lords and Patrons They had little choice of their own How devastating and soul crushing it was for them to discover later that their mission was a farce It was just a mere decoy to learn about sailing across the seas from the Spanish It was never about establishing trade relations or opening up to missionaries.The story is told from two perspectives One is from Father Velasco The second is from an unidentified third party observing the four samurai The four samurai have very distinctive characteristics and roles.Hasekura was the main protagonist He was the most moderate of the four His character seemed rather dull at first, but as things got worse and worse, I could not help but feel sorry for him Intrigued by the humanity of Christ, he struggles with his own existentialist beliefs We get a fair dose of Christology from the author.Matsuki was perhaps the most insightful of the four, recognizing the futility of their mission and pulling out halfway through, at the risk of being disgraced on his return He is also perhaps the most cowardly of the four, abandoning the remaining three who naively, but courageously soldier on to meet their fate.Tanaka was the quintessential samurai He is the most honour bound, all the way to his death by seppuku.Nishi was the most junior ranked of the four He was wide eyed and ingenuous.Father Valesco was single minded and ambitious, well meaning but misguided He was so blinded by his drive to establish Christianity in Japan, that he unwittingly catalyzes the downfall of the samurai There were interesting comparisons in the story As for the master and servant relationships, the samurai took care of their servants like family, whereas the samurai were disposable to their Lords The Japanese seemed vicious and ruthless compared to the Spanish, but the Spanish were probably no better.Lurking in the background of the story was the spectre of colonialism It was not explicit but the Spanish would have had designs on Japan While the samurai spent time in Neuva Espana Mexico and surrounds , they were not just seeing the effects of colonialism on the Indians, but rather what might have happened to the Japanese, if Tokugawa had not shut the doors The tales of their sea journey was harrowing I cannot imagine sailing across the Pacific or Atlantic in a small wooden vessel But while they survived the wild ocean, they could not navigate the political sea hide spoiler It is a moving story of courage, sacrifice and tragedy It s about these samurais,and their other guys.There was also this priest,who s not important, not in the least.Okay I kinda lied,cause for this priest some guys died.They were on an awesome mission to Spain,but they failed, it all went down the drain.They even became Christian for the mission,but none of the samurai did it of their own volition.Back in Japan they be persecutin,and all the Christians were in hidin.The priest guy didn t go back,cause Japan was all whack.The samurai totally feared It s about these samurais,and their other guys.There was also this priest,who s not important, not in the least.Okay I kinda lied,cause for this priest some guys died.They were on an awesome mission to Spain,but they failed, it all went down the drain.They even became Christian for the mission,but none of the samurai did it of their own volition.Back in Japan they be persecutin,and all the Christians were in hidin.The priest guy didn t go back,cause Japan was all whack.The samurai totally feared for their lives,if they died what would become of their wives At first things seemed okay,but then the order came in one day.The priest came back, that big dummy,He got caught, and had an upset tummy.Spat out the names of the samurai,who were then promptly brought forward to die.Cause they converted to a heathen religion ,it was kind of like a really big sin.So they were burned at the stake,and I totally ran out of rhymes.So in the end no one was alive,what a depressing book, one out of five In The Samurai, Endo tells his story from the point of view of two different characters Father Velasco, a Spanish Franciscan missionary, and Hasekura, a minor Japanese warrior, who is generally referred to in the text as The Samurai Father Velasco is attempting to spread Christianity in Japan in the 17th century He convinces the local shogun to send a delegation of Japanese to Nueva Espana Mexico for the stated purpose of opening up trade relations, but also to give Velascoauthority In The Samurai, Endo tells his story from the point of view of two different characters Father Velasco, a Spanish Franciscan missionary, and Hasekura, a minor Japanese warrior, who is generally referred to in the text as The Samurai Father Velasco is attempting to spread Christianity in Japan in the 17th century He convinces the local shogun to send a delegation of Japanese to Nueva Espana Mexico for the stated purpose of opening up trade relations, but also to give Velascoauthority in the Catholic church, which will he thinks make it easier for him to convert the Japanese people Hasekura is one of the warriors chosen to go on this long journey that ends up taking the party all the way to Rome.Endo does a fantastic job of realistically showing the Western point of view through Father Velasco, and of also showing the Eastern Japanese point of view through the samurai Both characters are very real, and both are compelling While I didn t like Father Velasco much at the beginning, he got much better by the end Hasekura is a sympathetic character throughout the book trapped between powers much greater than he is, he must continually bend to their will Through it all, he remains patient, though not very happy or content but I wouldn t be either.This is not the first book by Endo that I have read, but it is the one that I like best Endo is worth reading, and The Samurai is definitely an interesting read DNF 56% I decided to DNF this when I noticed that I wasn t looking forward to carrying on at all but was just forcing myself to because I d chosen it for a challenge book I think I need a break from reading challenges while my life is challenging This feels very similar to Silence which I read last year but without the same emotional energy I felt with that book DNF 56% I decided to DNF this when I noticed that I wasn t looking forward to carrying on at all but was just forcing myself to because I d chosen it for a challenge book I think I need a break from reading challenges while my life is challenging This feels very similar to Silence which I read last year but without the same emotional energy I felt with that book Excellent HF book based on a true story the voyage of four Japanese envoys in the early XVIIth century to Nueva Espa a, Spain and Rome, and from there all the way back to their homeland The story is told from two PoV Rokuemon Hasekura, a samurai whose family eagerly want to have their lands back were taken because they fought for the wrong side during a war , is probably the stereotype we have in mind when thinking about a samurai except there s no martial arts involved, or flying and non Excellent HF book based on a true story the voyage of four Japanese envoys in the early XVIIth century to Nueva Espa a, Spain and Rome, and from there all the way back to their homeland The story is told from two PoV Rokuemon Hasekura, a samurai whose family eagerly want to have their lands back were taken because they fought for the wrong side during a war , is probably the stereotype we have in mind when thinking about a samurai except there s no martial arts involved, or flying and none of this Hollywood bullshit someone loyal, obedient, and that wants to maintain his family s and ancestor s honour, as well as his own He s the one to describe how someone who has never been outside his master s lands feels when visiting two different continents and culture, and their face to face with Christianity There are three other envoys, who are also samurai, with their own personnality, which I really enjoyed reading The other side of the coin is Father Velasco, a Spanish Franciscan missionnary who has convinced himself that God wants him to prozelitise Japan, no matter the cost That s why, when a Japanese Lord starts to be interested in trading with Mexico, he soonly realises it is now or never if he wants to fulfill his ambition become the bishop of Japan Indeed, he knows that little trade would be possible between Japan and Spain as long as Christians are banned or severely punished in Japan Therefore, he uses the Japanese cravings for knowledge and profit to make them agree to send emmissaries to the Western World, and him with them But are the Japanese earnest Overall, their trip takes themthan seven years, and many things could ve changed It is a great book First, because it s a very interesting topic and the descriptions of both the Western and Japanese world seem very accurate Second, the characters and the plot are fantastic Except for the samurai, who are bound in their ignorance, everyone has an ulterior motive, an ambition, and nothing is what it seems The idea I got from the book is the difference between normal people and the government , the great interests , in a word, the world of politics which may be at a state level or for the ruling of the Church The hypocrisy, the selfishness, and the ever moving tides of power who are never reluctant to swallow a few middle men who never had a chance to survive in this game Again, great great book Well written Read it P.S Although the author was Catholic and there s a lot of discussion on the nature of Christianity which is very interesting btw , it is not proselytizing It s not a book about how cool Christianity is, it is not a book about redemption or how samurai convert into Catholicism because Western values are so much better It s nothing of the sort I thought the author s characters thoughts on religion, on the image of the Christ, and why some people believe, were very meaningful, very interesting, but in no way imposing themselves Shusako Endo was a member of a religious minority in Japan, leaning neither to Buddhism nor Shintoism nor to an effort to meld them He was a Catholic who spent part of his early childhood in Japanese occupied Manchuria before World War II In The Samurai Endo took up a story from early seventeenth century, when a low ranking vassal the translator calls him a lance corporal was sent in the company of a Franciscan to New Spain to open trade and wound up traveling as far as Rome Those lookin Shusako Endo was a member of a religious minority in Japan, leaning neither to Buddhism nor Shintoism nor to an effort to meld them He was a Catholic who spent part of his early childhood in Japanese occupied Manchuria before World War II In The Samurai Endo took up a story from early seventeenth century, when a low ranking vassal the translator calls him a lance corporal was sent in the company of a Franciscan to New Spain to open trade and wound up traveling as far as Rome Those looking for the mythical wandering swordsmen will be disappointed Endo s Rokuemon Hasekura is if anything tied too closely to his marshland home, and his isolation from power makes him a useful tool, not a wily rebel Hasekura and his comrades Endo gives him three other lance corporals, each with attendants, and merchants as well are given little information about what they are supposed to accomplish, and their efforts to carry out the will of the court are tragic, as is the ambition of the Franciscan who leads them, mostly astray Cut off from Japan, they have no way of learning that the court faction that supported them is being defeated by a very religious Buddhist who views Christianity as a threat to Japan In the background lurks the mercantile competition between Spain and the growing Protestant powers of Northern Europe loser to the narrative is the struggle between Catholic orders, pitting the Jesuits, who see their labors in Japan ending badly, and the Franciscans, who have shown up at just the wrong time to dispute missionary territory All this sounds like an intensely political work, but, aside from the great attention to character and period detail, this novel isof a meditation on duty, faith and loss One strand follows the journal of the priest who seeks to become the Bishop of Japan without comprehending that even the office will not be created a brilliant man trapped by his own machinations and sin of pride although he is made somewhatsympathetic by a worldly Vatican The journal alternates with the moving third person narrative from Hasekura, the bit player entrusted with a staggering duty the real meaning of which is hidden from him, and his efforts to understand the huge and strange new world he never sought out and the loss of the homeland and family to which he is devoted