Afterwar: Healing the Moral Wounds of Our Soldiers

Afterwar: Healing the Moral Wounds of Our Soldiers[Download] ➽ Afterwar: Healing the Moral Wounds of Our Soldiers Author Nancy Sherman – Oaklandjobs.co.uk Movies like American Sniper and The Hurt Locker hint at the inner scars our soldiers incur during service in a war zone The moral dimensions of their psychological injuries guilt, shame, feeling respo Movies like American Sniper the Moral PDF È and The Hurt Locker hint at the inner scars our soldiers incur during service in a war zone The moral dimensions of their psychological injuries guilt, shame, feeling responsible for doing wrong or being wronged elude conventional treatment Georgetown philosophy professor Nancy Sherman turns her focus to these moral injuries in Afterwar She argues that psychology and medicine alone are inadequate to help with many of the most painful questions veterans are bringing Afterwar: Healing PDF/EPUB or home from warTrained in both ancient ethics and psychoanalysis, and with twenty years of experience working with the military, Sherman draws on in depth interviews with servicemen and women to paint a richly textured and compassionate picture of the moral and psychological aftermath of America s longest wars She explores how veterans can go about reawakening their feelings without becoming re traumatized how they can replace resentment with trust and the changes that need to be made in Healing the Moral PDF/EPUB è order for this to happen by military courts, VA hospitals, and the civilians who have been shielded from the heaviest burdens of war million soldiers are currently returning home from war, the greatest number since Vietnam Facing an increase in suicides and post traumatic stress, the military has embraced measures such as resilience training and positive psychology to heal mind as well as body Sherman argues that some psychological wounds of war need a kind of healing through moral understanding that is the special province of philosophical engagement and listening. Philosophy modern treatment of soldiers powerful stuff Sweeping, informed narrative dating back to Seneca and earlier on how civilians should interact and treat those whom we have asked either directly or passively to inflict violence on others The author definitely knows what she is talking about, and anyone who has been curious about what else to say other than thank you for your service will find this book very interesting. I wish I had nicer things to say about this book, because it strikes me as well intentioned to the extent that I understand Sherman s project at all I have to confess that I have a difficult time understanding what much of the work that goes under the heading philosophy of emotion is getting at, and the basic purpose and message of this work are puzzling to me The book doesn t read as conventional philosophy, but neither does it seem targeted toward veterans or the civilians who play a rol I wish I had nicer things to say about this book, because it strikes me as well intentioned to the extent that I understand Sherman s project at all I have to confess that I have a difficult time understanding what much of the work that goes under the heading philosophy of emotion is getting at, and the basic purpose and message of this work are puzzling to me The book doesn t read as conventional philosophy, but neither does it seem targeted toward veterans or the civilians who play a role in reintegration Too much is promised in the way of helping civilians to appreciate their collective moral obligation toward those who serve I don t feel as though I understand any better than before how civilians are meant to play a part in healing moral injury, nor what beyond the commonsensical can be done to help build necessary trust between soldier veteran and society Sherman related some compelling and tragic tales, but I gained no coherent sense of message or lesson or even analytic insight In the end, I can t help but feel like I missed something here.The book contains a number of small copyediting errors, and a couple of minor military related factual mistakes will shake the confidence of the reader who hasthan a passing acquaintance with the armed forces One howler in particular is repeated throughout the book, inexplicably Sherman s undeviating practice of referring to Air Force personnel as wingmen instead of airmen On several occasions, she writes of soldiers, sailors, wingmen, and Marines One would think that an editor was playing a joke on her if the subject of the book were not so important This strange tic has nothing at all to do with the quality of Sherman s philosophical argument to the extent that the book includes one , but it s simply an incomprehensible error in a book that means to speak seriously to serious military subjects In Afterwar Healing the Moral Wounds of Our Soldiers , Nancy Sherman does a fairly good job in explaining the reader what moral wounds soldiers can have after war, where these moral wounds come from, and how one could help healing them The first chapters are based on actual cases in the context of current day s wars Any veteran or his her family and friends can easily relate to this In the next chapters, Sherman uses a lot of examples from the old Greeks, tough to read, even tougher to rela In Afterwar Healing the Moral Wounds of Our Soldiers , Nancy Sherman does a fairly good job in explaining the reader what moral wounds soldiers can have after war, where these moral wounds come from, and how one could help healing them The first chapters are based on actual cases in the context of current day s wars Any veteran or his her family and friends can easily relate to this In the next chapters, Sherman uses a lot of examples from the old Greeks, tough to read, even tougher to relate to An insightful book on why many veterans after their deployment try to escape from living folks, while they should try to escape from the killed ones This is one of the most important books I have read on ptsd Having had to live with it since my return from Indochina in 1972, disregarded, misdiagnosed, and accused of malingering for years until I finally found a psychologist who had some idea about what was happening to me in the early 1990 sI have an intimate knowledge from lived experience The so called treatments that have prevailed since then have been useless at best and destructive at worst, I finally dumped it all and started to expl This is one of the most important books I have read on ptsd Having had to live with it since my return from Indochina in 1972, disregarded, misdiagnosed, and accused of malingering for years until I finally found a psychologist who had some idea about what was happening to me in the early 1990 sI have an intimate knowledge from lived experience The so called treatments that have prevailed since then have been useless at best and destructive at worst, I finally dumped it all and started to explore the theory on my own I have read anything that seemed relevant that I could get my hands on This effort not only included readings on ptsd, but also psychology and Buddhist practice and meditation Buddhist practice and meditation have been really helpful in being able to simply cope, the psychology associated with that practice the most revealing Karen Horney, Eugene Gendlin, David Brazier and Stanislav Grof have provided a much needed structure within which to do the work.This book along with the writings of Edward Tick are the only approaches that cut right to the guts of the problem and explain much about the problem as it presents to those who suffer and are the only authors who critically pinpoint the changes in attitudes and approaches to interaction with veterans that therapist and wider society must undertake if this exploding problem is to be addressed with any efficacy at all I am not hopeful given my own experience anfd the massive cultural inertia that is extant and the rigid resistance of vested interests Particularly in Australia where the medicine has been privatized and therefore it is in the interests of greater profits to keep us cycling through a failing system

Afterwar: Healing the Moral Wounds of Our Soldiers Kindle
    This guide aims to show you how to download to happen by military courts, VA hospitals, and the civilians who have been shielded from the heaviest burdens of war million soldiers are currently returning home from war, the greatest number since Vietnam Facing an increase in suicides and post traumatic stress, the military has embraced measures such as resilience training and positive psychology to heal mind as well as body Sherman argues that some psychological wounds of war need a kind of healing through moral understanding that is the special province of philosophical engagement and listening. Philosophy modern treatment of soldiers powerful stuff Sweeping, informed narrative dating back to Seneca and earlier on how civilians should interact and treat those whom we have asked either directly or passively to inflict violence on others The author definitely knows what she is talking about, and anyone who has been curious about what else to say other than thank you for your service will find this book very interesting. I wish I had nicer things to say about this book, because it strikes me as well intentioned to the extent that I understand Sherman s project at all I have to confess that I have a difficult time understanding what much of the work that goes under the heading philosophy of emotion is getting at, and the basic purpose and message of this work are puzzling to me The book doesn t read as conventional philosophy, but neither does it seem targeted toward veterans or the civilians who play a rol I wish I had nicer things to say about this book, because it strikes me as well intentioned to the extent that I understand Sherman s project at all I have to confess that I have a difficult time understanding what much of the work that goes under the heading philosophy of emotion is getting at, and the basic purpose and message of this work are puzzling to me The book doesn t read as conventional philosophy, but neither does it seem targeted toward veterans or the civilians who play a role in reintegration Too much is promised in the way of helping civilians to appreciate their collective moral obligation toward those who serve I don t feel as though I understand any better than before how civilians are meant to play a part in healing moral injury, nor what beyond the commonsensical can be done to help build necessary trust between soldier veteran and society Sherman related some compelling and tragic tales, but I gained no coherent sense of message or lesson or even analytic insight In the end, I can t help but feel like I missed something here.The book contains a number of small copyediting errors, and a couple of minor military related factual mistakes will shake the confidence of the reader who hasthan a passing acquaintance with the armed forces One howler in particular is repeated throughout the book, inexplicably Sherman s undeviating practice of referring to Air Force personnel as wingmen instead of airmen On several occasions, she writes of soldiers, sailors, wingmen, and Marines One would think that an editor was playing a joke on her if the subject of the book were not so important This strange tic has nothing at all to do with the quality of Sherman s philosophical argument to the extent that the book includes one , but it s simply an incomprehensible error in a book that means to speak seriously to serious military subjects In Afterwar Healing the Moral Wounds of Our Soldiers , Nancy Sherman does a fairly good job in explaining the reader what moral wounds soldiers can have after war, where these moral wounds come from, and how one could help healing them The first chapters are based on actual cases in the context of current day s wars Any veteran or his her family and friends can easily relate to this In the next chapters, Sherman uses a lot of examples from the old Greeks, tough to read, even tougher to rela In Afterwar Healing the Moral Wounds of Our Soldiers , Nancy Sherman does a fairly good job in explaining the reader what moral wounds soldiers can have after war, where these moral wounds come from, and how one could help healing them The first chapters are based on actual cases in the context of current day s wars Any veteran or his her family and friends can easily relate to this In the next chapters, Sherman uses a lot of examples from the old Greeks, tough to read, even tougher to relate to An insightful book on why many veterans after their deployment try to escape from living folks, while they should try to escape from the killed ones This is one of the most important books I have read on ptsd Having had to live with it since my return from Indochina in 1972, disregarded, misdiagnosed, and accused of malingering for years until I finally found a psychologist who had some idea about what was happening to me in the early 1990 sI have an intimate knowledge from lived experience The so called treatments that have prevailed since then have been useless at best and destructive at worst, I finally dumped it all and started to expl This is one of the most important books I have read on ptsd Having had to live with it since my return from Indochina in 1972, disregarded, misdiagnosed, and accused of malingering for years until I finally found a psychologist who had some idea about what was happening to me in the early 1990 sI have an intimate knowledge from lived experience The so called treatments that have prevailed since then have been useless at best and destructive at worst, I finally dumped it all and started to explore the theory on my own I have read anything that seemed relevant that I could get my hands on This effort not only included readings on ptsd, but also psychology and Buddhist practice and meditation Buddhist practice and meditation have been really helpful in being able to simply cope, the psychology associated with that practice the most revealing Karen Horney, Eugene Gendlin, David Brazier and Stanislav Grof have provided a much needed structure within which to do the work.This book along with the writings of Edward Tick are the only approaches that cut right to the guts of the problem and explain much about the problem as it presents to those who suffer and are the only authors who critically pinpoint the changes in attitudes and approaches to interaction with veterans that therapist and wider society must undertake if this exploding problem is to be addressed with any efficacy at all I am not hopeful given my own experience anfd the massive cultural inertia that is extant and the rigid resistance of vested interests Particularly in Australia where the medicine has been privatized and therefore it is in the interests of greater profits to keep us cycling through a failing system "/>
  • Hardcover
  • 256 pages
  • Afterwar: Healing the Moral Wounds of Our Soldiers
  • Nancy Sherman
  • 14 April 2018
  • 0199325278