Bob Dylan: Like a Complete Unknown

Bob Dylan: Like a Complete Unknown[PDF / Epub] ★ Bob Dylan: Like a Complete Unknown ✪ David Yaffe – Oaklandjobs.co.uk An appreciative and incisive look at Bob Dylan s expansive career, published to coincide with the singer s seventieth birthdayBob Dylan is an iconic figure in American musical and cultural history, la An appreciative and incisive look Like a Epub Þ at Bob Dylan s expansive career, published to coincide with the singer s seventieth birthdayBob Dylan is an iconic figure in American musical and cultural history, lauded by Time magazine as one of the hundred most important people of the twentieth century For nearly fifty years the singer songwriter Bob Dylan: PDF/EPUB ² has crafted his unique brand of music, from hisself titled debut album toshit Together Through Life, appealing to everyone from baby boomers to the twenty somethings who storm the stage at his concertsIn Bob Dylan Like a Complete Unknown, literary scholar and music critic David Yaffe considers Dylan from four perspectives his complicated relationship to Dylan: Like a Kindle Ð blackness including his involvement in the civil rights movement and a secret marriage with a black backup singer , the underrated influence of his singing style, his fascinating image in films, and his controversial songwriting methods that have led to charges of plagiarism Each chapter travels from the s to the present, offering a historical perspective on the many facets of Dylan s life and career, exploring the mystery that surrounds the enigmatic singer and revealing the complete unknown Dylan. The dust jacket has a great photograph of Dylan in which he appears to be almost invisible You see a white cowboy hat, a bit of a blue jacket, shoulder and forearm, the upper neck of a guitar and the shadowed fingers of his hands That s all, the rest is black To a certain extent, Dylan has remained invisible to those who have tried, particularly in biography but also in criticism, to make sense of him In this regard he is not unlike Pablo Picasso Both were chameleons, both were rife with co The dust jacket has a great photograph of Dylan in which he appears to be almost invisible You see a white cowboy hat, a bit of a blue jacket, shoulder and forearm, the upper neck of a guitar and the shadowed fingers of his hands That s all, the rest is black To a certain extent, Dylan has remained invisible to those who have tried, particularly in biography but also in criticism, to make sense of him In this regard he is not unlike Pablo Picasso Both were chameleons, both were rife with contradictions, both in word and deed, and were totally, consistently unreliable in interviews though an aspect of their consistency was a refusal to tolerate any form of definition, which left a bottom line truth in all the obfuscations, contradictions, and, well, lies Don t label me Don t limit me Don t project on to me Instead of heeding the subterranean, consistent truth, writers have cherry picked the poisoned fruit of Dylan s interviews, friendly, combative, or pro forma, as if one might be the real Dylan revealed Maureen Dowd most recently took a bite from one of those apples to deleterious effect Picasso and Dylan, too, were sponges, soaking up influences across the full spectrum of their fields, and incorporating these influences into their work in ways that were revolutionary but also timelessly connected to tradition David Yaffe s book is not a biography or a comprehensive look at Dylan s work It s essentially a collection of four essays on Dylan, each with a discrete theme Dylan s voice, his connection to film by or about him or with him in it , his debt and affinity to black music and culture, and his Shakespearean habit of borrowing from the work of others They are all interesting topics, well covered and written The chapter on his voice is mostly focused on how and why it s changed over time and how well his late voice is suited for the kinds of songs he is singing and writing now I would have liked someon Dylan s influence as a singer, which is under appreciated since many folks can t get passed what Philip Larkin called a cawing, derisive voice and all that nasality The second chapter on Dylan and film is interesting, particularly as it talks early on how Dylan was influenced by American movies and film stars the references are many in his songs, but it s not on the level of importance as the last two chapters Dylan and what he owes to black music and culture and the issue of plagiarism The latter has three defenses 1 that s folk music for you if you stole from somebody, he she stole from someone first, who probably lifted from someone else 2 in art, bad artists copy and great artists steal 3 if what you steal is put together in inspired and new ways it s not stealing whatever the number of appropriated elements The connections to black culture are both obvious and surprising Dylan would have married Mavis Staples in the early 60s had she said yes Yaffe points out numerous complex references to black women in Dylan s songs and the fact that his second wife was a gospel singer who toured with him during the late 70s and 80s But it s a bigger connection, a larger debt, than that Dylan is a man in search of a place to be except for a brief moment around the time of New Morning and Planet Waves Dylan has never in work or interview acknowledged, let alone celebrated, his actual familial and community roots but instead insisted on an orphan s or runaway s identity He told the interviewer in the Scorsese documentary that he never felt like he belonged where he grew up or felt that he was part of that home or town He made up stories about his youth and early adulthood for interviewers when he first started out He s been on an endless tour for decades He often seems to live and work in another time and place Yaffe helps readers see this restlessness in a context of his musical interests and his own search for a personal resting place, a home, a community Yaffee is smart, well versed in Dylan s music and American literature and culture, bringing it all to bear in lucid prose that only occasionally gets compromised by the penchant that so many writers on Dyaln suffer from for cutesy paraphrases of Dylan s lyrics Bob Dylan Like a Complete Unknown is an engaging, perceptive easy read for fans or for interested folks who want a quick but nuanced introduction to the mystery that is Dylan Does the world need yet another Bob Dylan book Surprisingly in David Yaffe s case the answer is yes This short book takes four aspects of Dylan s muse including his widely attributed plagiarism or not, depending on your point of view and his smoke raddled ageing vocal chords range and the world worn new grain of the voice that this decline creates in his later work Yaffe, a music literature studies American academic, weaves an essay chapter around each of these ideas andwith great Does the world need yet another Bob Dylan book Surprisingly in David Yaffe s case the answer is yes This short book takes four aspects of Dylan s muse including his widely attributed plagiarism or not, depending on your point of view and his smoke raddled ageing vocal chords range and the world worn new grain of the voice that this decline creates in his later work Yaffe, a music literature studies American academic, weaves an essay chapter around each of these ideas andwith great verve, imagination and clarity The best chapter is a daring one, focusing on an issue rarely properly taken on in all the myriad Dylan books for sale over the years namely Dylan s blackness The immersion of Bob Dylan in black culture has been muchlasting than his flirtation with Born Again Christianity in the late 1970s That particular religious interlude was said to be the result of Dylan s religious black girl friend at the time asking him do you pray Later, in the 1980s, he secretly married at least one black woman Carolyn Dennis who had been in the ever changing group of black women back up singers who pervaded his live performances from 1978 to 1986 And Dennis and Dylan had a daughter together Yaffe goes beyond personal aspects of Dylan s life though and shows how much Dylan s music and performance depends on the thorough going immersion in black culture and musical history This isthan a white negro syndrome in Dylan s case His musical heroes Robert Johnson, Muddy Waters, Charley Patton, Blind Willie McTell among them are, now that he is 70 years old, literally the main role models for his never ending tour live performances of over 100 each year Yaffe could have extended this theme over a whole book his analysis is so sharp, erudite and convincing Well worth investigating this book, Dylan fan or not Four essays explore Dylan The one about his voice intrigued me, but the ones about his blackness, songwriting and films did not David Yaffe worked on Reckless Daughter A Portrait of Joni Mitchell while writing this book That was a good, solid and well researched five star story So I thought this would be of similar caliber It falls short Two stars short Overwrought It is hard to know where to place Dylan, writes Yaffe He arrived in the sixties as a hybrid, assimilating himself from oth Four essays explore Dylan The one about his voice intrigued me, but the ones about his blackness, songwriting and films did not David Yaffe worked on Reckless Daughter A Portrait of Joni Mitchell while writing this book That was a good, solid and well researched five star story So I thought this would be of similar caliber It falls short Two stars short Overwrought It is hard to know where to place Dylan, writes Yaffe He arrived in the sixties as a hybrid, assimilating himself from others His influences came from everywhere Dylan belongs among singer songwriters, a cult of authenticity whose members included Muddy Waters, Odetta, Woody Guthrie and Joni Mitchell Dylan s harsh and strident caw also characterized Leonard Cohen, Tom Waits, Neil Young, Lou Reed and Patti Smith, writes Yaffe In sixty five we could understand him, now his voice croaks, Yaffe wrote eight years ago Yaffe s slim yet scholarly book is full of respect for the many contradictions that make Dylan so fascinating Yaffe is an intelligent and balanced author, combining great love as a fan with a professor s critical summation skills Understanding Dylan s mercurial nature and vast body of work is, in my humble yet obsessive opinion as a songwriting admirer, a worthwhile pursuit Yaffe offers a playlist at the end of the book that in itself is worth the price and our time. very interesting short meditations on various aspects of dylan s work lots of good insights. The book tries to do several things on the topic of Dylan, but only manages to do a few of them This is a book I didn t like so much, but it s also a book I feel like I need to apologize for not likingThe author knows his stuff, and he has to juggle the demands of the Yale Icon series, which seeks to examine American culture through the focused lens of single people, events or things Perhaps I ve read too much about Dylan or lived with his music for too long, but the book offers too few The book tries to do several things on the topic of Dylan, but only manages to do a few of them This is a book I didn t like so much, but it s also a book I feel like I need to apologize for not likingThe author knows his stuff, and he has to juggle the demands of the Yale Icon series, which seeks to examine American culture through the focused lens of single people, events or things Perhaps I ve read too much about Dylan or lived with his music for too long, but the book offers too few insights for its length He criticizes Dylan s pilfering of American tradition, which is fine He takes Dylan down a notch or two, which is also fine He positions him among other great singer songwriters who are his equals, which works well But, by the end I didn t feel I understood Dylandeeply than when I started The author also has an annoying, almost cloying, habit of slipping in quotes from Dylan s work in the middle of his own sentences That might be fine, poetic even, except that he criticizes Dylan for slipping in quotes from all over the place into his songs, without giving the source, credit or, he seems to suggest, respect due The playlist in the appendix, always interesting for Dylan listeners to check out, seems to reduce the cultural context of the songs themselves, since most were part of larger song cycles on albums and CDs That, and the portion of the book spent on his social presence, takes time away from commentary on the music, analysis of the lyrics or figuring out the why of his powerful effect on listeners that has continued for decades Despite these criticisms, I would not want to have not read this work He makes a lot of fine points, draws interesting new connections, and covers a lot of territory I felt in the end, though, that somehow this was not the work he wanted to write on Dylan Maybe that work will come out later, and Yaffe s earlier work on jazz Fascinating Rhythm Reading Jazz in American Writing, remains an excellent, indispensable work on the intersection of jazz and prose A must read for any Dylan fan It s a witty, well written synopsis of Bob s life as a homeless road warrior, poet, song and dance man legend. Very nice book by David Yaffe, I enjoyed the analysis of Dylan s voice as well as the aspect of his attraction and imitation of black music A nice addition to the Dylan library.

Bob Dylan: Like a Complete Unknown PDF ì Dylan: Like
    Bob Dylan: Like a Complete Unknown PDF ì Dylan: Like perspective on the many facets of Dylan s life and career, exploring the mystery that surrounds the enigmatic singer and revealing the complete unknown Dylan. The dust jacket has a great photograph of Dylan in which he appears to be almost invisible You see a white cowboy hat, a bit of a blue jacket, shoulder and forearm, the upper neck of a guitar and the shadowed fingers of his hands That s all, the rest is black To a certain extent, Dylan has remained invisible to those who have tried, particularly in biography but also in criticism, to make sense of him In this regard he is not unlike Pablo Picasso Both were chameleons, both were rife with co The dust jacket has a great photograph of Dylan in which he appears to be almost invisible You see a white cowboy hat, a bit of a blue jacket, shoulder and forearm, the upper neck of a guitar and the shadowed fingers of his hands That s all, the rest is black To a certain extent, Dylan has remained invisible to those who have tried, particularly in biography but also in criticism, to make sense of him In this regard he is not unlike Pablo Picasso Both were chameleons, both were rife with contradictions, both in word and deed, and were totally, consistently unreliable in interviews though an aspect of their consistency was a refusal to tolerate any form of definition, which left a bottom line truth in all the obfuscations, contradictions, and, well, lies Don t label me Don t limit me Don t project on to me Instead of heeding the subterranean, consistent truth, writers have cherry picked the poisoned fruit of Dylan s interviews, friendly, combative, or pro forma, as if one might be the real Dylan revealed Maureen Dowd most recently took a bite from one of those apples to deleterious effect Picasso and Dylan, too, were sponges, soaking up influences across the full spectrum of their fields, and incorporating these influences into their work in ways that were revolutionary but also timelessly connected to tradition David Yaffe s book is not a biography or a comprehensive look at Dylan s work It s essentially a collection of four essays on Dylan, each with a discrete theme Dylan s voice, his connection to film by or about him or with him in it , his debt and affinity to black music and culture, and his Shakespearean habit of borrowing from the work of others They are all interesting topics, well covered and written The chapter on his voice is mostly focused on how and why it s changed over time and how well his late voice is suited for the kinds of songs he is singing and writing now I would have liked someon Dylan s influence as a singer, which is under appreciated since many folks can t get passed what Philip Larkin called a cawing, derisive voice and all that nasality The second chapter on Dylan and film is interesting, particularly as it talks early on how Dylan was influenced by American movies and film stars the references are many in his songs, but it s not on the level of importance as the last two chapters Dylan and what he owes to black music and culture and the issue of plagiarism The latter has three defenses 1 that s folk music for you if you stole from somebody, he she stole from someone first, who probably lifted from someone else 2 in art, bad artists copy and great artists steal 3 if what you steal is put together in inspired and new ways it s not stealing whatever the number of appropriated elements The connections to black culture are both obvious and surprising Dylan would have married Mavis Staples in the early 60s had she said yes Yaffe points out numerous complex references to black women in Dylan s songs and the fact that his second wife was a gospel singer who toured with him during the late 70s and 80s But it s a bigger connection, a larger debt, than that Dylan is a man in search of a place to be except for a brief moment around the time of New Morning and Planet Waves Dylan has never in work or interview acknowledged, let alone celebrated, his actual familial and community roots but instead insisted on an orphan s or runaway s identity He told the interviewer in the Scorsese documentary that he never felt like he belonged where he grew up or felt that he was part of that home or town He made up stories about his youth and early adulthood for interviewers when he first started out He s been on an endless tour for decades He often seems to live and work in another time and place Yaffe helps readers see this restlessness in a context of his musical interests and his own search for a personal resting place, a home, a community Yaffee is smart, well versed in Dylan s music and American literature and culture, bringing it all to bear in lucid prose that only occasionally gets compromised by the penchant that so many writers on Dyaln suffer from for cutesy paraphrases of Dylan s lyrics Bob Dylan Like a Complete Unknown is an engaging, perceptive easy read for fans or for interested folks who want a quick but nuanced introduction to the mystery that is Dylan Does the world need yet another Bob Dylan book Surprisingly in David Yaffe s case the answer is yes This short book takes four aspects of Dylan s muse including his widely attributed plagiarism or not, depending on your point of view and his smoke raddled ageing vocal chords range and the world worn new grain of the voice that this decline creates in his later work Yaffe, a music literature studies American academic, weaves an essay chapter around each of these ideas andwith great Does the world need yet another Bob Dylan book Surprisingly in David Yaffe s case the answer is yes This short book takes four aspects of Dylan s muse including his widely attributed plagiarism or not, depending on your point of view and his smoke raddled ageing vocal chords range and the world worn new grain of the voice that this decline creates in his later work Yaffe, a music literature studies American academic, weaves an essay chapter around each of these ideas andwith great verve, imagination and clarity The best chapter is a daring one, focusing on an issue rarely properly taken on in all the myriad Dylan books for sale over the years namely Dylan s blackness The immersion of Bob Dylan in black culture has been muchlasting than his flirtation with Born Again Christianity in the late 1970s That particular religious interlude was said to be the result of Dylan s religious black girl friend at the time asking him do you pray Later, in the 1980s, he secretly married at least one black woman Carolyn Dennis who had been in the ever changing group of black women back up singers who pervaded his live performances from 1978 to 1986 And Dennis and Dylan had a daughter together Yaffe goes beyond personal aspects of Dylan s life though and shows how much Dylan s music and performance depends on the thorough going immersion in black culture and musical history This isthan a white negro syndrome in Dylan s case His musical heroes Robert Johnson, Muddy Waters, Charley Patton, Blind Willie McTell among them are, now that he is 70 years old, literally the main role models for his never ending tour live performances of over 100 each year Yaffe could have extended this theme over a whole book his analysis is so sharp, erudite and convincing Well worth investigating this book, Dylan fan or not Four essays explore Dylan The one about his voice intrigued me, but the ones about his blackness, songwriting and films did not David Yaffe worked on Reckless Daughter A Portrait of Joni Mitchell while writing this book That was a good, solid and well researched five star story So I thought this would be of similar caliber It falls short Two stars short Overwrought It is hard to know where to place Dylan, writes Yaffe He arrived in the sixties as a hybrid, assimilating himself from oth Four essays explore Dylan The one about his voice intrigued me, but the ones about his blackness, songwriting and films did not David Yaffe worked on Reckless Daughter A Portrait of Joni Mitchell while writing this book That was a good, solid and well researched five star story So I thought this would be of similar caliber It falls short Two stars short Overwrought It is hard to know where to place Dylan, writes Yaffe He arrived in the sixties as a hybrid, assimilating himself from others His influences came from everywhere Dylan belongs among singer songwriters, a cult of authenticity whose members included Muddy Waters, Odetta, Woody Guthrie and Joni Mitchell Dylan s harsh and strident caw also characterized Leonard Cohen, Tom Waits, Neil Young, Lou Reed and Patti Smith, writes Yaffe In sixty five we could understand him, now his voice croaks, Yaffe wrote eight years ago Yaffe s slim yet scholarly book is full of respect for the many contradictions that make Dylan so fascinating Yaffe is an intelligent and balanced author, combining great love as a fan with a professor s critical summation skills Understanding Dylan s mercurial nature and vast body of work is, in my humble yet obsessive opinion as a songwriting admirer, a worthwhile pursuit Yaffe offers a playlist at the end of the book that in itself is worth the price and our time. very interesting short meditations on various aspects of dylan s work lots of good insights. The book tries to do several things on the topic of Dylan, but only manages to do a few of them This is a book I didn t like so much, but it s also a book I feel like I need to apologize for not likingThe author knows his stuff, and he has to juggle the demands of the Yale Icon series, which seeks to examine American culture through the focused lens of single people, events or things Perhaps I ve read too much about Dylan or lived with his music for too long, but the book offers too few The book tries to do several things on the topic of Dylan, but only manages to do a few of them This is a book I didn t like so much, but it s also a book I feel like I need to apologize for not likingThe author knows his stuff, and he has to juggle the demands of the Yale Icon series, which seeks to examine American culture through the focused lens of single people, events or things Perhaps I ve read too much about Dylan or lived with his music for too long, but the book offers too few insights for its length He criticizes Dylan s pilfering of American tradition, which is fine He takes Dylan down a notch or two, which is also fine He positions him among other great singer songwriters who are his equals, which works well But, by the end I didn t feel I understood Dylandeeply than when I started The author also has an annoying, almost cloying, habit of slipping in quotes from Dylan s work in the middle of his own sentences That might be fine, poetic even, except that he criticizes Dylan for slipping in quotes from all over the place into his songs, without giving the source, credit or, he seems to suggest, respect due The playlist in the appendix, always interesting for Dylan listeners to check out, seems to reduce the cultural context of the songs themselves, since most were part of larger song cycles on albums and CDs That, and the portion of the book spent on his social presence, takes time away from commentary on the music, analysis of the lyrics or figuring out the why of his powerful effect on listeners that has continued for decades Despite these criticisms, I would not want to have not read this work He makes a lot of fine points, draws interesting new connections, and covers a lot of territory I felt in the end, though, that somehow this was not the work he wanted to write on Dylan Maybe that work will come out later, and Yaffe s earlier work on jazz Fascinating Rhythm Reading Jazz in American Writing, remains an excellent, indispensable work on the intersection of jazz and prose A must read for any Dylan fan It s a witty, well written synopsis of Bob s life as a homeless road warrior, poet, song and dance man legend. Very nice book by David Yaffe, I enjoyed the analysis of Dylan s voice as well as the aspect of his attraction and imitation of black music A nice addition to the Dylan library. "/>
  • ebook
  • 192 pages
  • Bob Dylan: Like a Complete Unknown
  • David Yaffe
  • English
  • 08 August 2019
  • 1283113228